BTA1_Greece_2.6 - 46. Discuss the ways that some architects...

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46. Discuss the ways that some architects of the 20th century have considered the architecture of ancient Greece in their work. Use diagrams where appropriate to elaborate your answer. Mies van der Rohe, who was very much influenced by the austere precision of the ancient Greeks, had difficulty in resolving the problem created by the re-entrant right-angled corner in his Seagram’s Building. The stoa of Miletus in ancient Greece had several re-entrant right-angled corners like van der Roche’s building. In ancient Greece, this condition introduces a rather tricky architectural problem for the Doric order in the way the triglyphs are distributed. The re-entrant corner is always an architectural problem, especially when it is an architecture predicated on the careful articulation of its parts through a systematic ordering of its elements. In the case of the stoa at Miletus, the resolution called into existence the heart-shaped Doric column plan as well as a bent triglyph. Neither of these are particularly happy solutions. 47. Who was Hippodamus, what did he do, where did he have the greatest impact, what were his basic ideas? Using diagrams, compare the mainland agora with the Ionian agora. How are they different from one another? How are they alike? Hippodamus was a Greek architect, theoretician and geometrician. He conceived the ideal city as having a population of no more than 10,000 inhabitants. He designed
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the plan for a new Miletus. Hippodamus understood that the urban grid provided a repetitive, clear geometry that would allow all building, which he defined in three classes, public, private, and sacred, to be coordinated in coherently organized blocks and sectors. He also understood that cities needed to have various districts with specific purposes as well as dividing its citizens into three classes, artisans, farmers, and soldiers. For him the city was not merely a political organism, it also must be in harmony with the kosmos. 48. What are the differences between Egyptian orthogonal town planning and Greek orthogonal town planning? The grid-like setup of the buildings is seen in both Greek and Egyptian cities. The difference between Greek and Egyptian orthogonal town planning is that at the centers of most Greek cities was a public meeting place called an agora. The Egyptians, on the
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other hand, did not have a defined form for a public meeting place in their cities. Also,
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This homework help was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course ARCH 2110 taught by Professor Bell during the Fall '07 term at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

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BTA1_Greece_2.6 - 46. Discuss the ways that some architects...

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