(24) Sound Waves in an Ideal Gas

E the normal mode with the lowest oscillation

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Unformatted text preview: llustrates (in a schematic fashion) the characteristic displacement patterns and oscillation frequencies of the pipe's first three normal modes (i.e., , and 3). It can be seen that the modes all have a node at the closed end of the pipe, and an anti- node at the open end. The fundamental harmonic has a wavelength that is four times the length of the pipe. The first overtone harmonic has a wavelength that is rds the length of the pipe, and a frequency that is three times that of the fundamental. Finally, the second overtone has a wavelength that is ths the length of the pipe, and a frequency that is five times that of the fundamental. By contrast, the normal modes of a guitar string have nodes at either end of the string. (See Figure 24.) Thus, the fundamental harmonic has a wavelength that is twice the length of the string. The first overtone harmonic has a wavelength that is the length of the string, and a frequency that is twice that of the fundamental. Finally, the second overtone harmonic has a wavelength that is rds the length of the string, and a frequency that is three times that of the fundamental....
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This note was uploaded on 08/25/2013 for the course PHY 315 taught by Professor Staff during the Fall '08 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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