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Second Quarter Book Analysis Jane Eyre-Theme Essay In the novel “Jane Eyre” by Charlotte Bronte, the theme of the story is that though cruelty and hardship can often make a person feel like a hopeless outsider, one who works to live with virtue and integrity will be rewarded with a sense of belonging. From the very start of her story, Jane is an outsider in her family. The only person who treats Jane with kindness and respect is the maid of the house, Bessie. Bessie’s kindness attributed to Jane’s reciprocated kindness and respect towards her, a foreshadowing of the lesson that one’s own honest effort will earn them the care of others. It is decided by Janes cruel aunt that she will go to Lowood, a religious boarding school for orphaned girls. Jane loses all of her patience and stands up to her aunt; she tells her aunt that she will inform everyone at her school how wickedly she has been treated. At this point in time, Jane is still desiring revenge against her aunt and cares deeply about what others think of her. Jane quickly makes a friend named Helen Burns, who is of the opinion that one’s own morality and conscience is more important than the opinion of others; Helen’s attitude represents the lesson of the story. When Jane’s reputation is sorely damaged after Mr. Brocklehurst tells the entire school that Jane is a careless, and horrible child, she is crushed by this display of reprimand in front of every student and distraught that her scholarship and good behavior has been devalued. Helen attempts to comfort Jane with the idea that conscience is more important, but Jane, still young and immature, goes on to say that she would suffer immense pain in order to be loved, demonstrating her lack of integrity and desperate desire for affection. When Helen later dies in Jane’s arms, she acts as foreshadowing for the lesson Jane must learn, Jane is left alone to ponder the acts of her lost friend and to learn the lesson that Helen already understood herself. As time passes, Jane grows older and leaves Lowood to become a governess at a residence called Thornfield Hall. She is accompanied by an uneducated French girl named Adele, who is to be her pupil. Jane soon meets the disagreeable but intriguing Edward Rochester, who owns the property. Jane begins to fall hopelessly in love with Mr. Rochester, but is tortured when it becomes apparent that he is planning to marry Blanche Ingram, a young woman of high social status, accomplishment and beauty. Jane keeps to herself and hides her love for Rochester since she believes that Rochester is in love with another women. She focuses on her job of teaching Adele, praising her for her accomplishments in spite of Mr. Rochester’s assertion that Adele is a talentless child of one of his former mistresses. Despite everything, Jane and Mr. Rochester fall madly in love and he soon confesses his secret love for Jane, which she accepts with eagerness and a healthy level of caution. However, on

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