Architecture_NotesFeb16

Architecture_NotesFeb16 - Thu 16 Roman Architecture....

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Thu 16 – Roman Architecture . Readings: Kostof, chap. 9. W. MacDonald, The Pantheon , W. MacDonald, Architecture of the Roman Empire , Yale University Press, 1982, I, pp. 94-121. *Etruscan temple Follows its own language Two sets of orders supporting a roof Plan is not like Greek Three cellars – rotated with main axis Roman architecture Able to extrapolate the best of both cultures Greek and Etruscan *Typical Plan of Roman city Also follows cardinal points Two main axes intersect in center Roman cities always in valleys and flatlands, also by rivers Because that’s where the roads go Rome is actually the only city that doesn’t follow this pattern But it’s the exception that confirms the rule Over time, it had to expand *example – Florence – can still see the geometric city grid from aerial view *Centuriatio Grid that organized the city is expanded into the country Organize the country – how the fields would be divided, etc Squares of fields
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course AHIS C3001 taught by Professor Benelli during the Spring '06 term at Columbia.

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Architecture_NotesFeb16 - Thu 16 Roman Architecture....

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