Electrolytes Lab.doc - Name Date of Experiment Period Lab...

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Name ____________________________________ Date of Experiment_________ Period _____ Lab Partners ___________________________________________________________________ Electrolytes and Non-Electrolytes 1 Introduction Some substances, when dissolved in water or in a liquid state, have the ability to conduct an electrical current. These substances are called electrolytes. The quantity of current conducted is related to the number of ions that are present. Some substances ionize completely (100%) when dissolved in water. These conduct the most current and are therefore classified as strong electrolytes . Other substances ionize incompletely (less than 100%). In other words, some of the molecules ionize and some of them do not. These compounds conduct less current and are called weak electrolytes . Finally, some compounds dissolve, but do not form ions when dissolved. Since no ions are present, no electrical current can be conducted. These are called non-electrolytes . Purpose To classify compounds as strong electrolytes, weak electrolytes, or non-electrolytes by testing their conductivity in aqueous solution Safety Wear goggles at all times. Gloves are optional. Do not touch any chemicals with bare hands. Wash hands immediately if you get any materials on your hands. Secure lids on all containers when you are finished using them. Materials Reaction well plate, conductivity tester, pipette Group A: chemicals solids Sodium chloride (NaCl), copper (II) sulfate (CuSO 4 ), sucrose (C 12 H 22 O 11 ), sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO 3 ), corn starch (C 6 H 12 0 6 ) n , potassium chloride (KCl), potassium iodide (KI) Group B: chemical solutions Hydrochloric acid (HCl), acetic acid (C 2 H 4 O 2 ), ammonia (NH 3 ), sodium hydroxide

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