philosophy104-ethical relativism

philosophy104-ethical relativism - Rachel Smith 09/24/06...

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Rachel Smith 09/24/06 Ethical Relativism Ethical Relativism if the premise that one’s actions are relative to one’s culture. An action x is right if and only if a culture allows x. One’s actions must coincide with what is socially acceptable or they are deemed morally wrong. This emphasizes the idea of cultural differences and accepting other people instead of judging them for how they perceive right and wrong. There are no absolute truths so morality is open to interpretation. This allows for diversity in society, one doesn’t have to fear celebrating their culture, and their traditions because there is no right or wrong. One culture does not have the power to judge another culture and there motives for doing something when they themselves can not definitively say their morals are fact. Ethical Relativism also gives people a moral code for their own culture so they know how to act, what is considered good, or what would be shocking that they should avoid. Though Ethical Relativism is beneficial to society it also has its criticism.
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course PHIL 104 taught by Professor Bontly during the Fall '08 term at UConn.

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