colonism - Black Power The Politics of Liberation in...

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Black Power: The Politics of Liberation in America Black Power: The Politics of Liberation in America by Carmichael and Hamilton suggests that in American society, African Americans are controlled by a colonial relationship to the population majority through subtle (and not so subtle) forms of oppression. The idea of internal colonialism is presented and described as political and economic discrimination fueled by exploitation of minority groups in the society. The writers focus on the three main areas that this discrimination occurs, which are social, economic, and political regions. Throughout the book, it constantly reiterates the importance of African American individuals joining together to create an essential change in America’s society. “Institutional racism has been maintained deliberately by the power structure and through indifference, inertia and lack courage on the part of white masses as well as petty officials (Carmichael and Hamilton 1967, p. 22)”. Black Power is meant to provide a radical framework intended to jumpstart a societal reform against institutional racism. I found it intriguing that the authors claimed that white people and black people have a different definition of “integration”. “Integration is another current example of a word which has been defined according to the way white Americans see it. To many of them, it means black men wanting to marry white daughters; it means, “race mixing”- implying bed or dance partners. To black people, it has meant a way to improve their lives – economically and politically (Carmichael and Hamilton 1967, p. 37)”. I believe that in this quote the book seems outdated. Even though many disagree with interracial relationships, not all white people are opposed to the idea. The authors seem cluster white people in this group of closed-minded individuals devoid of racial
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