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Surname 1Student’s Name:Instructor’s NameCourse:Date:Chinese Literature Lu Xun's "A Madman's Diary" is a historical novel that came into the limelight in 1918. Itis rated as one of the first most impactful modern pieces of work in the republican era. The literalwork was written in the Chinese native language and would become the pillar of the new civilization movement. In a collection of Lu Xun's short stories titled the "Call to Arms," it is positioned as the first story. Its richness in Chinese cultural heritage and civilization was popularly termed as modernity's footstool. Conversely, Shen Congwen's "Xiaoxiao" is an interesting coming-of-age narrative that draws a picture of Chinese rural life. The story also highlights the fiction of modern Chinese. The setting of the story is captured in a rural village in West Hunan. An analysis of the Chinese rural-tradition's comparison depicted by the two novels outlines the two materials' visions of modernity. In both form and content, Lu Xun's "Diary of a Madman" draws attention to the contestation that was witnessed between tradition and modernity. This conflict took place at a heightened stage during the period of rapid political and cultural change. In Lu Xun's stories, the madman needs a cure because he is suffering from a scary illness. The sickly man is limited in receiving treatment from a traditional physician who perceives his pulse without any relevant medication (Lu 6). The neighbors and passers-by foolishly stare at the whole scenario. This escapade demonstrates the outdated method of medical treatment that existed in the premodern Chinese era. The insane were treated in a backward and wayward manner that had no relevance
Surname 2and validity. This form of treatment is the main concern of Lu Xun, who vehemently condemns this ancient form of treatment. To prove his point, he enrolls in medical school and becomes a physician who practices his services in a professional and westernized style. Instead, Lu Xun gives attention to the healing power of literature. Notably, the primary theme in "Madman's Diary" is less concerned with the traditional method of treating the insane in ancient Chinese culture. The main focus of the narrative is the causal forces that led to the madness itself. The madman continuously losses his touch on reality when he is persuaded that his parents practice cannibalism. He also learns that his parents are earnestly preparing him to get cannibalized in the coming future. The core of the narration centers on irony. The protagonist of the story, though ostensibly mad, is still the same character who witnesses the mercilessness of his cannibalistic society with a clear perspective. In the literature of Chinese antiquity, cannibalism seems to exist with glaring frequency (Lu 11).

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