Unit 3

Unit 3 - A CRITICAL ANALYSIS: LARUEN GENOVESI'S ENTERING A...

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A CRITICAL ANALYSIS: LARUEN GENOVESI’S ENTERING
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A Critical Analysis: Lauren Genovesi’s Entering Entering into a relationship not only entails letting someone else into your life, but also allowing yourself into theirs. Things previously considered your own (feelings, understandings, etc.) are now shared interests between the two of you; as are theirs. It can begin very subtly: a quick call in the morning when you wake up, a text right before you go to bed. Then it happens. You start to ask what your counterpart is feeling more often than you ask yourself. Gone are the days when the most important opinion to you is yours. A startling realization once finally in full effect, but perhaps even scarier is the knowledge that this may one day change; one day may be gone. Lauren Genovesi’s poem Entering very accurately illustrates the above. The poem is written from the perspective of a person in a seemingly extended relationship that is slowly coming to the realization that the relationship has changed. Things are good starting out. When one person in the relationship points to something, even something trivial, the other person responds by wanting to knowing everything about it; the color, the feel, the smell. Not because that thing is of any particular interest to the person, but because it is of interest to the one pointing it out. The desire to know the inner workings of a partners mind even overcomes the triviality of understanding something as simple as
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Unit 3 - A CRITICAL ANALYSIS: LARUEN GENOVESI'S ENTERING A...

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