ap2012_frq_eng_language

Flexibility in the coming year to set delivery

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Unformatted text preview: g year to set delivery schedules, prices and labor costs. The changes could mean an end to Saturday deliveries, longer delivery times for letters and packages, higher postage-stamp prices that exceed the rate of inflation, and the potential for future layoffs. “At the end of the day, I’m convinced that if we make the changes that are necessary, we can continue to provide universal service for Americans for decades to come,” Potter said Monday. “We can turn back from the red to the black, but there are some significant changes we need to make.” The postmaster general called for many of these changes last year but failed to convince lawmakers. This time he’s armed with $4.8 million worth of outside studies that conclude that, without drastic changes, the mail agency will face even more staggering losses. From The Washington Post, © March 02, 2010 The Washington Post. All rights reserved. Used by permission and protected by the Copyright Laws of the United States. The printing, copying, redistribution, or retransmission of the Material without express written permission is prohibited. © 2012 The College Board. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.org. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. -5- 2012 AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS Source D Hawkins, Dawn. “Advantages of Using the United States Postal Service.” Associated Content. Associated Content, 14 Aug. 2009. Web. 27 Sept. 2010. The following is excerpted from an online article. Note: The article by Dawn Hawkins does not appear on this website due to copyright constraints. © 2012 The College Board. Visit the College Board on the Web: www.collegeboard.org. GO ON TO THE NEXT PAGE. -6- 2012 AP® ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION FREE-RESPONSE QUESTIONS Source E McDevitt, Caitlin. “To Postal Workers, No Mail Is ‘Junk’: With Revenues Falling, the Post Office Owes Its Future to Stuff We Throw Out.” Newsweek. Newsweek, 27 Sept. 2008. Web. 28 Sept. 2010. The following is excerpted from an online article in a national news magazine. These are tough times for the U.S. Postal Service. It’s being pummeled by high fuel costs. The soft economy is crimping the overall volume of mail, which fell 5.5 percent in the past year. Its business is also falling as Americans opt for e-mail over birthday cards and thank-you notes. Now comes another threat: consumers like Colleen Plimpton of Bethel, Conn. Earlier this year Plimpton became tired of the credit-card offers, catalogs and advertising fliers that clogged her mailbox. So in February she paid $20 to GreenDimes, a firm that helps consumers reduce their inflow of “junk mail” by contacting businesses on their behalf. “[Junk mailers] are cutting down trees willy-nilly, and that has got to stop,” says Plimpton. To the post office, consumers like her are a serious threat. “Efforts to convince people not to receive mail are really going to hurt,” says Steve Kearney, a Postal Service senior vice president...
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