1.30-2.1 - American Foreign Policy January 30, 2007 1819:...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
American Foreign Policy  30/01/2007 16:06:00 January 30, 2007 1819: Settlers to TX 1836: TX independent  1846: OR Treaty  1846-48: Mexican American War 1849: CA Gold Rush  1839-42: Opium War 1851-64: Taiping Rebellion  1853-4: Perry in Tokyo  1861: U.S. Civil War starts 1862: Emancipation Proclamation  1865: Civil War Ends 1867: Max I killed 1868: Meiji Restoration  Latin American Politics, continued     Bolivar as the ‘George Washington’ of South America Wants ‘Grand Colombia’ (superstate)  Why is George Washington so successful, and Bolivar ultimately not?
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Around 1821, Bolivar begins to turn the tide  San Martin gives army to Bolivar  1826: last Spanish flag goes down in S. America  Bolivar aims higher, and decides to unite S. America by liberating others However, his empire is falling apart; why? b/c of Spanish threat This is big contrast to U.S., where we faced British threat o Unlike England, Spanish did not have a big navy  o When Spanish army/navy collapses, it’s over; no need for a huge state  when ‘your enemies aren’t really your enemies’  Still, Bolivar wants a ‘Grand Colombia’ superstate in northern South America As his alliance splits, Bolivar calls a conference, which keeps failing  Ultimately, Bolivar is outlawed from country and dies  United States was hesitant to recognize S. American states; John Quincy Adams gives  speech suggesting we should stay out of South American affairs 1890 Transcontinental Treaty: Spain gives Florida to U.S. Perhaps this is why JQ Adams didn’t want to mess with Europe/Spain – he  feared they’d take back Spain Washington/Bolivar comparison Washington measured his strength and enemies’ strength very well; Bolivar  always thought far too much of himself  Bolivar too much of a gambler; when Washignton ‘won,’ he took his winnings  and did something with them  Monroe Doctrine (1823)     Joint proclamation establishes non-intervention policy w/ Britain; JQ Adams  opposes
Background image of page 2
U.S. issues Monroe Doctrine 1) non-colonization 2) two spheres doctrine: “America for the Americans, Europe for the  Europeans. Leave us alone.”  o As Greece nationalism goes on, we know Europe wants us out 3) non-intervention: leave revolutionary states alone  Monroe Doctrine is hit with U.S. public Leads to overtures from S. America around 1824, but we decline to help  Indian Politics Passim     Key players: lots of tribes, U.S. gov’t, public, and other great powers Huge mix of people and motives 
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 12

1.30-2.1 - American Foreign Policy January 30, 2007 1819:...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online