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PREPARED BY:PROF NAME:CLASS:DATE PREPARED:PROBLEM SOLUTION ESSAYResearch indicates that active involvement is the most powerful and fundamentalprinciple of human learning and college success(Astin -1993).It can be considered to thetouchstone or"home base" of college success,because it provides the basic foundation forall other college -success strategies.When this involvement is limited it also as a resultlead to distructions either to the students as well as the whole school fraternity.This essaydepicts problems that are as a result of lack of students involvent in details.The 20 century brought about a new style of educating students. During this time,philosopher John Dewy created the idea of using personal experiences of the student toincrease the quality and quantity of material learned. Later, in 1908, Rufus Stimson, anagricultural education teacher, began putting this theory to use in his classroom. Stimsonhad his students use their experiences through projects at home as a base knowledge fortheir agricultural education courses. Thus, creating the idea of a “home project” (Dyer,1995). The Smith-Hughes National Vocational Act was passed in 1917, and Stimson’sconcept of a “home project” became an official part of a vocational agricultural educationprogram as supervised agricultural experiences (SAE) programs (Dryer, 1995).Once SAEs were implemented, teachers began to realize agricultural education needed toinvolve more than only one home project. As a result, broader SAE programs wereimplemented and defined as “…all the practical agricultural activities of educationalvalue conducted by students outside of class and laboratory instruction or on school-
released time for which systematic instruction and supervision are provided by theirteachers, parents, employers, or others.” (Phipps & Osborne, 1988)SAE programs increase educational value by connecting the theories and conceptslearned in the agricultural education classroom to understandable context (Phipps,Osborne, Dryer, & Ball, 2008). Today SAEs are defined as “the application of theconcepts and principles learned in the agricultural education classroom in planned, real-life settings under the supervision of the agriculture teacher” (Talbert, Vaughn, Croom &Lee, 2007).For the first 50 years of agricultural education programs, the Smith-Hughes Act requiredevery student have a SAE. Federal and state supervisors monitored agricultural educationinstructors involvement by requiring detailed records of the student’s SAE programs.These records were compiled into an annual report to be sent to the state agriculturaleducation office. Many times regional and district supervisors would accompany theinstructors on their SAE visits (Lewis 2012). Because of these regulations, participationin supervised agricultural experiences was strong.

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