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climatemurrray - CLIMATE CHANGE READINGS: FREEMAN, 2005...

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CLIMATE CHANGE READINGS: FREEMAN, 2005 Chapter 54 Pages 1259-1261
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CLIMATE CHANGE Climate refers to the long-term weather conditions of a particular place; a community, biome or the biosphere. When the weather condition is temperature and the place is the biosphere (ecosphere), then the change is called global warming . When changes go beyond warming to the causes and effects of warming, then the change is called global change . One of the earliest predictions of global change related increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide to increased warming.
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The Carbon Dioxide Question Over 110 years ago (1896), a Swedish chemist Svante August Arrhenius recognized that carbon dioxide allows short-wavelength solar radiation to penetrate the atmosphere but traps this energy when it is reradiated back from earth at higher wavelengths. He concluded that the more carbon dioxide, the more warming. It was postulated that this had happened on Mars and Venus, but would it happen on earth?
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Seeking Answers to the Carbon Dioxide Question In 1956 Roger Revelle and Hans Suess, geochemists at the Scripps Institute, saw a need to measure carbon dioxide in the air so as to get “a clearer understanding of the probable climatic effects of the predicted great industrial production over the next 50 years.” They realized the necessity to set up monitoring equipment far from local sources and sinks of CO 2 and hired Charles David Keeling for the project.
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Carbon Dioxide Is Increasing in the Atmosphere (Mauna Loa) Unambiguous data on changes in atmospheric CO 2 has been available only since 1958 when a monitoring station was established on Mauna Loa. Since that time, CO 2 concentration has increased from around 315 ppm to 380 ppm in 2006 or about 1.35 ppm per year. ppm is parts per million.
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Carbon Dioxide Is Increasing in the Atmosphere (Antarctica Ice Bubbles) The half-centuary record at Mauna Loa is convincing but too short to address concerns about the effects of fossil fuel burning. A long term perspective has been gained from measuring CO 2 in air bubbles trapped in ice cores. The records for the last 1,000 years show an average of around 280 ppm up until the beginning of the industrial revolution in the mid to late 1800’s. ppm is parts per million.
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Carbon Dioxide Is Increasing in the Atmosphere Measures of CO 2 concentration from a variety of sites confirm a dramatic increase associated with the burning of fossil fuels. There is no question that the atmospheric concentration of this gas is increasing, but what is the greenhouse effect that Arrhenius spoke of over 100 years ago?
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The term greenhouse effect draws an analogy between the temperature holding capacity of a greenhouse (glasshouse) and the earth’s atmosphere. Just as a glasshouse holds
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course BIOS 101 taught by Professor Molumby during the Spring '08 term at Ill. Chicago.

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climatemurrray - CLIMATE CHANGE READINGS: FREEMAN, 2005...

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