Coffin.Intro to Neuropharmacology.Part1.2S.311

Coffin.Intro to Neuropharmacology.Part1.2S.311 -...

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9/18/13 Introduction to Neuropharmacology Part 1 Vicki Coffin, PhD ©2011
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9/18/13 Introduction to Neuropharmacology Learning Objectives Explain the neurobiology of the neuron: structure, transportation, know what is in and on the neuron Be able to explain the importance of neuronal development and pruning in the neurobiology of the functioning brain Be able to describe the function of synapses and their role in neuronal communication Explain how different neurotransmitters act on a signal conduction cascade and what are the key products
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9/18/13 Introduction to Neuropharmacology Learning Objectives Know the MOA and main effects or efficacy of neurotransmitters: use dopamine, serotonin and acetylcholine as examples Explain potential drug targets with regards to neurotransmitters and their communication role, i.e. presynaptic, postsynaptic and transporter receptors
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9/18/13 Types of Neurotransmitters Neuropeptides Small molecule transmitters Amino acids: glutamate (excitatory), g- aminobutyric acid (GABA) (inhibitory), glycine (inhibitory) Biogenic amines Acetylcholine Biogenic monamines: dopamine, norepiephrine, epinephrine, tyramine, serontonin, histamine Purines adenosine, ATP and derivatives (antagonist at adenosine receptors; caffeine)
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9/18/13 Types of Neurotransmitter cont… Small molecule transmitters cont… Other proposed small molecules carbon monoxide (CO) nitric oxide (NO) zinc Fatty acids anandamide, may be endogenous cannabinoid Neurotransmitters are the basis for neuropsychopharmacology. Where are these neurotransmitters?
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9/18/13 Neurons The cells of chemical communication in the brain. Billions of neurons connected to trillions of synapses. Localization within Stahl’s Essential Pharmacology online
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9/18/13 Specialized Purkinje Neuron Large neurons in the cerebellum with an extensive branched dendritic tree. They release GABA, an inhibitory neurotransmitter.
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9/18/13 Unique Structure of Neurons Pyramidal cells are the majority of cells in the prefrontal cortex, and are in the hippocampus and amygdala
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9/18/13 Alzheimer’s disease: brain tissue has fewer nerve cells and synapses Plaques , abnormal clusters of protein fragments between cells Dead and dying nerve cells contain tangles , twisted strands of proteins inside the cell
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Coffin.Intro to Neuropharmacology.Part1.2S.311 -...

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