4470Lecture_10

4470Lecture_10 - Professor Darius A Spieth Art History Program LSU School of Art Ansel Adams Monolith The Face of Half Dome Yosemite Valley

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Unformatted text preview: Professor: Darius A. Spieth Art History Program LSU School of Art Ansel Adams, Monolith, The Face of Half Dome, Yosemite Valley, California , ca. 1927, gelatin-silver print Like Watkins, Muybridge, Ansel Adam’s claim to fame in the history of photography is his work of richly textures photographs of Yosemite Valley Working in the mid-1920s, he came to embody the purist approach to the medium; for many critics, he made the definitive pictorial statement on the American western landscape He was also strongly associated with a visionary sense of the redemptive beauty of wilderness and the importance of its preservation The prestige and popularity of his work has been enhanced by the extraordinary technical perfection of his photography and his insistence on absolute control of the photographic processes Ansel Adams, Nevada Fall, Yosemite National Park , ca. 1932, gelatin-silver print Born in San Francisco, Adams manifested an early interest in music and the piano, an interest which he initially hoped to develop into a professional career In 1916 he took his first photographs of the Yosemite Valley, an experience of such intensity that he was to view it as a lifelong inspiration; he studied photography with a photofinisher, producing early work influenced by the then prevalent pictorialist style Each summer he returned to Yosemite where he developed an interest in conservation > these trips involved exploration, climbing and photography, and by 1920 he had formed an association with the Sierra Club; in 1927 his first portfolio was published, Parmelian Prints of the High Sierras . Ansel Adams, Moonrise, Hernandez, New Mexico , 1941, gelatin-silver print An early stylistic influence was that of Strand’s “straight photography”; he met Strand in 1930 and Stieglitz in 1933, the year Adams founded the the Ansel Adams Gallery in San Francsico; Adams impressed Stieglitz so much that an important one- man exhibition of his work was shown at An American Place in 1936 In 1932, Adams and several other California-based photographers, notably Edward Weston and Imogen Cunningham, founded Group f/64; for Adams and Weston especially, the f/64 philosophy embodied an approach to perfect realization of photographic vision through technically flawless prints Ansel Adams, Lake MacDonald, Glacier National Park , 1942, gelatin-silver print After 1936, Adams moved into the Yosemite Valley and made trips throughout the Southwest with Weston, Georgia O'Keeffe, and David McAlpin With the arrival of World War II, Adams went to Washington, D.C., where he worked as a photomuralist for the Department of the Interior; during this time he began to develop a codification of his approach to exposure, processing, and printing - the zone system Guggenheim Fellowship in 1948 and ongoing support for his endeavors by the Sierra Club allowed him to publish three more portfolios of his serene landscape photographs between 1948 and 1960 Edward Weston,...
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course ART 4470 taught by Professor Dariusa.spieth during the Spring '08 term at LSU.

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4470Lecture_10 - Professor Darius A Spieth Art History Program LSU School of Art Ansel Adams Monolith The Face of Half Dome Yosemite Valley

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