1600-1700 Baroque. Dutch Art X

1600-1700 Baroque. Dutch Art X - Dutch Baroque Art...

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Unformatted text preview: Dutch Baroque Art (1600-1700) Key vocabulary terms: Treaty of Mnster (1648) Group portrait, militia guild Genre scenes Dutch Baroque Art 30 year war reconfigures Europe along the national lines. Involves much of Europe. War concluded in 1648. The dutch republic came under Spanish occupation. Social stratification of the Dutch was very different than the Italians. Had a very well to do upper middle class, who had enough money to commission works of art. Well look at landscapes, portraits, genre scenes, works that are secular in their subject. Some still paint religious art, but also a prevalence of secular works. Hendrickter Brugghen, Calling of St. Mathew , 1621, Oil on canvas Dutch follower of Caravaggio. Merits comparison with Caravaggios own representation of the very same subject. *Think about the similarities and differences between Caravaggios work and Brugghens calling of St. Mathew. Similar to Caravaggios Calling of St. Mathew : figures dressed in contemporary fashion, emphasis on gesture with the central protaginist, direct light source coming from the corner, not idealized, plebian figure types, the setting also similar: both set in very mundane settings. Modeling is similar, both modeled figures in dramatic charascutto, dramatic contrasts in light and shadow. Different from Caravaggios Calling of St. Mathew: figures in Brugghen brought up in a dramatic closeup, Caravaggios values darker. Brugghens higher values, bright blue, salmon color. Frans Hals, Archers of Saint Hadrian, ca. 1633, Oil on Canvas Worked in the city of Haarlem. Credited with certain pictorial innovations in the dutch baroque. Generates these innovations in the group portrait genre(portrait that includes 2 or more people) This is a group portrait of a dutch militia guild. After the 30 years war the militia function is defunct and the gatherings would go on for days, so much so that some cities placed stipulations on how many days they could meet. For the most part group portraits had had the figures lined up in a group, eg: school portrait. Frans Hals arranges the figures on diagonals, one of the major things we associate with baroque compositions, has the figures interact with one another. The spears and the flags themselves, create diagonals, creating a greater sense of visual interest. Some figures gesture towards eachother, look out directly at the viewer, or at different space. His technique is very loose and brushy, known for his open brushwork, layers the paint in thick heavy layers. Frans Hals, The Jolly Toper, ca. 1628-30, Oil on canvas Holding a glass filled with wine in his left hand. Captures him in this dramatic fashion as hes looking towards us. Face has a gentle jolly expression, broad...
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1600-1700 Baroque. Dutch Art X - Dutch Baroque Art...

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