MR-Sentence-Correction-Guide

Of irregular verbs can be found in helpful topics 174

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Unformatted text preview: is the most common one, used to express factual statements. I love playing the piano. The imperative mood is used to express commands. Please close the window immediately! The subjunctive mood expresses possibilities and wishes. If I were you, I would tell him my feelings. The subjunctive is rarely used, but it is more often found in formal American usage than in British. The present subjunctive is very rare, having been overtaken by the present indicative, which it resembles in all parts except the third person singular: the subjunctive has no -s ending. The verb to be, however, has the form be for every person. I’ll call you if need be. The past subjunctive is identical with the ordinary past tense, but again, the verb to be is different, having the form were for all persons. If I were you, I would not do that. Since the subjunctive expresses possibility, not fact, it is therefore found in (1) Clauses beginning with if, as if, though, as though and www.manhattanreview.com c 1999 - 2008 Manhattan Review Sentence Correction Guide – Grammar Review 19 (2) After verbs expressing some kind of wish, recommendation, proposal, desire, regret, doubt, or demand. The if (in subjunctive mood), as if, though, as though clauses express a condition that is NOT true. Dependent Clause Present (True Condition) Past (Untrue Condition) Past Perfect (Untrue Condition) Example Main Clause Will/Can + Verb (base form) If you put your heart into it, you will be the winner. Would/Could + Verb (base form) Would have/Could have + Verb (past participle) If you put your heart into it, you could be the winner. If you had put your heart into it, you could have been the winner. When the subjective is used after verbs expressing some kind of wish, recommendation, proposal, desire, regret, doubt, or demand, there is a degree of uncertainty related to the final outcome. Wrong She recommended that John should take the ferry. She recommended that John takes the ferry. She recommended that John had taken the ferry. Correct She recommended that John take the ferry. Note that you should ALWAYS just use the base form of the verb in such a subjunctive construction involving the that clause. Regarding a list of words that are associated with the subjunctive mood, unfortunately, there’s no hard and fast principle for it. This is what the linguists would call a lexical issue; the particular word and its meaning determine whether or not it can take an infinitive complement. The following verbs can be used with a subjunctive that-clause: advise advocate ask beg decide decree demand desire dictate insist intend mandate move (in the parliamentary sense) order www.manhattanreview.com c 1999 - 2008 Manhattan Review Sentence Correction Guide – Grammar Review 20 petition propose recommend request require resolve suggest urge vote Of these, the following can ALSO take an infinitive, X to Y construction: advise ask beg order petition request require urge The infinitive group is to some d...
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