MR-Sentence-Correction-Guide

The urging of somebody between 2 vs among 2 affect

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Unformatted text preview: d instead takes the meaning of “whether”. This is particularly true with the GMAT. Using “whether” exclusively avoids the possible confusion between different possible meanings of “if”. Wrong I don’t know if I am ready to take the test now and if I will ever be ready in the future. Correct I don’t know whether I am ready to take the test now and whether I will ever be ready in the future. “Despite” is not the same as “Although”. “Despite” means ‘with intention, in the face of an obstacle’. Wrong Despite having 5% of the world’s population, the USA uses 30% of the world’s energy. Correct Despite his poor education, he succeeded in becoming wealthy. www.manhattanreview.com c 1999 - 2008 Manhattan Review Sentence Correction Guide – Sentence Correction 55 Idiomatic Prepositions: based on composed by meaning “created by” vs composed of meaning “made up of” credit with (not credit to) depend on differ with (meaning “disagree with”) vs differ from (meaning “be different from”) discourage from doing something/encourage to do something (from is a preposition here; to is the infinitive here) prefer to prevent from prohibit from Idiomatic Phrases Involving or Omitting “As” consider x y (not to be y) defined as depicted as regard x as y regarded as think of x as y view x as y Idiomatic Phrases Involving or Omitting the Infinitive “to” Help someone do something Make someone do something Enable someone to do something Forbid x to do y Words Associated with Subjunctive Mood in “that” Clause Demand that Mandate that Request that Require that something be (not are/is) Different Applications Involving “use” Use (verb): I use a pencil to write. Used to (to is the infinitive): I used to teach every night. Be used to something/doing something (to is preposition): I am used to challenges. I am used to being challenged. www.manhattanreview.com c 1999 - 2008 Manhattan Review Sentence Correction Guide – Sentence Correction 56 It + adjective After verbs such as believe, consider, feel, find, think, we can use it + adjective before a “that” clause or the infinitive. I find it impulsive to talk to the CEO directly in an elevator without being introduced. He felt it dreadful that his wife was diagnosed with anemia. Avoid Run-On Sentence A run-on sentence consists of two or more main clauses that are run together without proper punctuation. People often speak in run-on sentences, but they make pauses and change their tone so others can understand them. But in writing, we must break our sentences into shorter units so that all the readers can understand us. Wrong It is nearly six o’clock we have not gone through all the practice problems yet. There are several acceptable ways to correct this: • Insert a semicolon between the clauses: It is nearly six o’clock; we have not gone through all the practice problems yet. • Write the two clauses as two separate sentences: It is nearly six o’clock. We...
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This document was uploaded on 09/26/2013.

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