A Guide to Project Management

Charter a project charter is a document that formally

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Unformatted text preview: tion is critical to project success. "When there is poor scope definition, final project costs can be expected to be higher because of the inevitable changes which disrupt project rhythm, cause rework, increase project time, and lower the productivity and morale of the workforce" (3). A Guide to the A Guide to the Inputs .1 .2 .3 .4 .5 Scope statement Constraints Assumptions Other planning outputs Historical information Project Project Management Management Body of Body of KnowledgeE L KnowledgeE PL Tools & Techniques .1 Work breakdown structure templates .2 Decomposition Outputs .1 Work breakdown structure .2 Scope statement updates 5.3.1 Inputs to Scope Definition .1 Scope statement. The scope statement is described in Section 5.2.3.1. .2 Constraints. Constraints are described in Section 5.1.3.3. When a project is done under contract, the constraints defined by contractual provisions are often important considerations during scope definition. .3 Assumptions. Assumptions are described in Section 4.1.1.5. .4 Other planning outputs. The outputs of the processes in other knowledge areas should be reviewed for possible impact on project scope definition. .5 Historical information. Historical information about previous projects should be considered during scope definition. Information about errors and omissions on previous projects should be especially useful. MP AM SA S 5.3.2 Tools and Techniques for Scope Definition .1 Work breakdown structure templates. A WBS (described in Section 5.3.3.1) from a previous project can often be used as a template for a new project. Although each project is unique, WBSs can often be "reused" since most projects will resemble another project to some extent. For example, most projects within a given organization will have the same or similar project life cycles, and will thus have the same or similar deliverables required from each phase. A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide) 2000 Edition 2000 Project Management Institute, Four Campus Boulevard, Newtown Square, PA 19073-3299 USA NAVIGATION LINKS ACROYMNS LIST ACRONYMS LIST 57 ACROYMNS LIST Chapter 5--Project Scope Management Figure 52 | 5.3.3.1 Aircraft System Project Management Systems Engineering Management Supporting PM Activities Training Data Air Vehicle Support Equipment Facilities Test and Evaluation Equipment Training Facilities Training Services Training Technical Orders Engineering Data Management Data Organizational Level SE Intermediate Level SE Depot Level SE Base Buildings Mock-ups Maintenance Facility Operational Test Developmental Test Test ment ment Airframe Engine Communication System Navigation System Fire Control System This WBS is illustrative only. It is not intended to represent the full project scope of any specific project, nor to imply that this is the only way to organize a WBS on this type of project. geE L geE PL Figure 52. Sample Work Breakdown Structure for Defense Material Items P Many applica...
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