A Guide to Project Management

Life cycle may be used as the first level of

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Unformatted text preview: Formal acceptance A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide) 2000 Edition 2000 Project Management Institute, Four Campus Boulevard, Newtown Square, PA 19073-3299 USA NAVIGATION LINKS ACROYMNS LIST ACRONYMS LIST 61 ACROYMNS LIST Chapter 5--Project Scope Management 5.4.1 Inputs to Scope Verification .1 Work results. Work results--which deliverables have been fully or partially completed--are an output of project plan execution (discussed in Section 4.2). .2 Product documentation. Documents produced to describe the project's products must be available for review. The terms used to describe this documentation (plans, specifications, technical documentation, drawings, etc.) vary by application area. .3 Work breakdown structure. The WBS aids in definition of the scope, and should be used to verify the work of the project (see Section 5.3.3.1). .4 Scope statement. The scope statement defines the scope in some detail and should be verified (see Section 5.2.3.1). .5 Project plan. The project plan is described in Section 4.1.3.1. 5.4.1 | 5.5.3.1 ment ment 5.4.2 Tools and Techniques for Scope Verification .1 Inspection. Inspection includes activities such as measuring, examining, and testing undertaken to determine whether results conform to requirements. Inspections are variously called reviews, product reviews, audits, and walkthroughs; in some application areas, these different terms have narrow and specific meanings. geE L geE PL P 5.4.3 Outputs from Scope Verification .1 Formal acceptance. Documentation that the client or sponsor has accepted the product of the project phase or major deliverable(s) must be prepared and distributed. Such acceptance may be conditional, especially at the end of a phase. 5.5 SCOPE CHANGE CONTROL Scope change control is concerned with a) influencing the factors that create scope changes to ensure that changes are agreed upon, b) determining that a scope change has occurred, and c) managing the actual changes when and if they occur. Scope change control must be thoroughly integrated with the other control processes (schedule control, cost control, quality control, and others, as discussed in Section 4.3). Inputs .1 .2 .3 .4 Work breakdown structure Performance reports Change requests Scope management plan Tools & Techniques .1 Scope change control system .2 Performance measurement .3 Additional planning .1 .2 .3 .4 Outputs Scope changes Corrective action Lessons learned Adjusted baseline 62 NAVIGATION LINKS ACROYMNS LIST ACRONYMS LIST ACROYMNS LIST A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide) 2000 Edition 2000 Project Management Institute, Four Campus Boulevard, Newtown Square, PA 19073-3299 USA Chapter 5--Project Scope Management 5.5.1 Inputs to Scope Change Control .1 Work breakdown structure. The WBS is described in Section 5.3.3.1. It defines the project's scope baseline. .2 Performance reports. Performance reports, discussed in Section 10.3.3.1, provide information on scope perfor...
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