A Guide to Project Management

A Guide to Project Management

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Unformatted text preview: ent or function (e.g., engineering, manufacturing, marketing). Functional Organization. An organization structure in which staff are grouped hierarchically by specialty (e.g., production, marketing, engineering, and accounting at the top level; with engineering, further divided into mechanical, electrical, and others). Gantt Chart. See bar chart. Grade. A category or rank used to distinguish items that have the same functional use (e.g., "hammer"), but do not share the same requirements for quality (e.g., different hammers may need to withstand different amounts of force). Graphical Evaluation and Review Technique (GERT). A network analysis technique that allows for conditional and probabilistic treatment of logical relationships (i.e., some activities may not be performed). Hammock. An aggregate or summary activity (a group of related activities is shown as one and reported at a summary level). A hammock may or may not have an internal sequence. See also subproject and subnet. Hanger. An unintended break in a network path. Hangers are usually caused by missing activities or missing logical relationships. Information Distribution. Making needed information available to project stakeholders in a timely manner. Initiation. Authorizing the project or phase. Integrated Change Control. Coordinating changes across the entire project. Integrated Cost/Schedule Reporting. See earned value. Invitation for Bid (IFB). Generally, this term is equivalent to request for proposal. However, in some application areas, it may have a narrower or more specific meaning. Key Event Schedule. See master schedule. Lag. A modification of a logical relationship that directs a delay in the successor task. For example, in a finish-to-start dependency with a ten-day lag, the successor activity cannot start until ten days after the predecessor has finished. See also lead. Late Finish Date (LF). In the critical path method, the latest possible point in time that an activity may be completed without delaying a specified milestone (usually the project finish date). Late Start Date (LS). In the critical path method, the latest possible point in time that an activity may begin without delaying a specified milestone (usually the project finish date). Lead. A modification of a logical relationship that allows an acceleration of the successor task. For example, in a finish-to-start dependency with a ten-day lead, the successor activity can start ten days before the predecessor has finished. See also lag. Lessons Learned. The learning gained from the process of performing the project. Lessons learned may be identified at any point. Also considered a project record. Level of Effort (LOE). Support-type activity (e.g., vendor or customer liaison) that does not readily lend itself to measurement of discrete accomplishment. It is generally characterized by a uniform rate of activity over a period of time determined by the activities it supports. Leveling. See resource leveling. Float |...
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This document was uploaded on 09/27/2013.

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