A Guide to Project Management

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Unformatted text preview: ls of intensity throughout each phase of the project. Figure 3-2 illustrates how the process groups overlap and vary within a phase. Finally, the process group interactions also cross phases such that closing one phase provides an input to initiating the next. For example, closing a design phase requires customer acceptance of the design document. Simultaneously, the design document defines the product description for the ensuing implementation phase. This interaction is illustrated in Figure 3-3. Repeating the initiation processes at the start of each phase helps to keep the project focused on the business need that it was undertaken to address. It should also help ensure that the project is halted if the business need no longer exists, or if the project is unlikely to satisfy that need. Business needs are discussed in more detail in the introduction to Section 5.1, Initiation. It is important to note that the actual inputs and outputs of the processes depend upon the phase in which they are carried out. Although Figure 3-3 is drawn with discrete phases and discrete processes, in an actual project there will be many overlaps. The planning process, for example, must not only provide ment ment geE L geE PL P 30 NAVIGATION LINKS ACROYMNS LIST ACRONYMS LIST ACROYMNS LIST A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide) 2000 Edition 2000 Project Management Institute, Four Campus Boulevard, Newtown Square, PA 19073-3299 USA Chapter 3--Project Management Processes Initiating Processes Planning Processes Controlling Processes Executing Processes (arrows represent flow of information) A Guide to the A Guide to the Closing Processes Figure 31. Links among Process Groups in a Phase Level of Activity Planning Processes Initiating Processes Project Project Management Management Body of Body of KnowledgeE L KnowledgeE PL Executing Processes Time Phase Start MP AM SA S Controlling Processes Initiating Processes Closing Processes Phase Finish Figure 32. Overlap of Process Groups in a Phase Design Phase Initiating Processes Planning Processes Implementation Phase Planning Processes Prior Phases ... Controlling Processes Executing Processes Controlling Processes Executing Processes ... Subsequent Phases Closing Processes Closing Processes Figure 33. Interaction between Phases A Guide to the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK Guide) 2000 Edition 2000 Project Management Institute, Four Campus Boulevard, Newtown Square, PA 19073-3299 USA NAVIGATION LINKS ACROYMNS LIST ACRONYMS LIST 31 ACROYMNS LIST Chapter 3--Project Management Processes Figure 34 | Figure 35 Initiating Processes SCOPE 5.1 Initiation To the Planning Processes (Figure 35) Figure 34. Relationships among the Initiating Processes ment ment details of the work to be done to bring the current phase of the project to successful completion, but must also provide some preliminary description of work to be done in later phases. This progressive detailing of the project plan is often c...
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This document was uploaded on 09/27/2013.

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