Fundamentals Of Project Management

That is someone else might draw the arrow diagram a

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: printed them, so if the diagram shows this, it is wrong. There is no single right solution, but a diagram can be said to be wrong if it violates logic. The network for the yard project could get a lot more complicated. You could add edge front sidewalk and edge back sidewalk. You could talk about trimming around trees in both front and back. And so on. But there is no need to make it too complicated. We don’t usually try to capture exactly how we will do the work, just the gist of it. The next step is to figure out how long it will take to do the job. Time estimates for each task are made by using history—remembering how long each activity has taken in the past. Remember, though, that the estimate is valid only for the individual who is going to do the task. If my daughter, who is sixteen, does the lawn mowing using a push mower, it will probably take less time than if my son, who is only twelve, tackles the job. (In Chapter 6, we discuss how to find the critical path through the network, which helps you figure out how long the project will take.) It is hard to tell if a network is absolutely correct, but it can be said to be wrong if logic is violated. Figure 5-5 Work breakdown structure for room-cleaning project. EXERCISE For the WBS in Figure 5-5, draw an arrow diagram. One solution is shown in the Appendix. Key Points to Remember • Project management is not just scheduling. • Arrow diagrams allow an easier assessment of the impact of a slip on a project than do Gantt charts. • Schedule at a level of detail that can be managed. • No task should be scheduled with a duration much greater than four to six weeks. Subdivide longer tasks to achieve this objective. Previous Table of Contents Next www.erpvn.net Products | Contact Us | About Us | Privacy | Ad Info | Home Use of this site is subject to certain Terms & Conditions, Copyright © 1996-2000 EarthWeb Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction whole or in part in any form or medium without express written permission of EarthWeb is prohibited. Read EarthWeb's privacy statement. www.erpvn.net Fundamentals of Project Management by James P. Lewis AMACOM Books ISBN: 0814478352 Pub Date: 01/01/95 Search Tips Search this book: Advanced Search Previous Table of Contents Next Title Chapter 6 Scheduling Computations ----------- Once a suitable network has been drawn, with durations assigned to all activities, it is necessary to determine where the longest path is in the network and whether it will meet the target completion date. Since the longest path through the project determines minimum project duration, if any activity on that path takes longer than planned, the end date will slip accordingly. Because of its importance, this path is called the critical path. The critical path is the longest path through a project network. It therefore determines the earliest completion for the work. Normally, you would let a computer do these computations for you, so you may wonder why it is necessary to k...
View Full Document

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Ask a homework question - tutors are online