Fundamentals Of Project Management

Be reported tasks that have high levels of technical

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Unformatted text preview: er liabilities? 5. Information relevant to other projects. What has been learned from this audit that can or should be applied to other projects, whether in progress or about to start? 6. Limitations of the audit. What factors might limit the validity of the audit? Are any assumptions suspect? Are any data missing or suspected of contamination? Was anyone uncooperative in providing information for the audit? Previous Table of Contents Next www.erpvn.net Products | Contact Us | About Us | Privacy | Ad Info | Home Use of this site is subject to certain Terms & Conditions, Copyright © 1996-2000 EarthWeb Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction whole or in part in any form or medium without express written permission of EarthWeb is prohibited. Read EarthWeb's privacy statement. www.erpvn.net Fundamentals of Project Management by James P. Lewis AMACOM Books ISBN: 0814478352 Pub Date: 01/01/95 Search Tips Search this book: Advanced Search Previous Table of Contents Next Title In general, the simpler and more straightforward a project audit report, the better. The information should be organized so that planned versus actual results can be easily compared, and significant deviations should be highlighted and explained. Key Points to Remember ----------- • The meaning of control that is important to project managers is the one that implies the use of information—comparing progress to plan so that corrective action can be taken to correct for deviations from plan. • The only way a project will really be under control is if every team member is in control of his or her own work. • The effort used to control a project should be worthwhile. You don’t want to spend $100 to purchase a $3 battery, for example. • If you do not react in response to a deviation, you have a monitoring system, not a control system. • Project working times must be recorded daily. If people wait a week to capture what they have done, they rely on memory and end up writing down only their estimates of what they actually did. Such data are no good for future estimating. • Project evaluation can help you determine whether a project should continue or be canceled. Audits also should help the team learn in order to improve performance. Previous Table of Contents Next www.erpvn.net Products | Contact Us | About Us | Privacy | Ad Info | Home Use of this site is subject to certain Terms & Conditions, Copyright © 1996-2000 EarthWeb Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction whole or in part in any form or medium without express written permission of EarthWeb is prohibited. Read EarthWeb's privacy statement. www.erpvn.net Fundamentals of Project Management by James P. Lewis AMACOM Books ISBN: 0814478352 Pub Date: 01/01/95 Search Tips Search this book: Advanced Search Previous Table of Contents Next Title Chapter 8 Project Control Using Earned Value Analysis ----------- The goal of exercising control is to achieve project objectives; there are cost, time, performance, and scope tar...
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