Fundamentals Of Project Management

Must be reduced if you plug the required finish into

Info iconThis preview shows page 1. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Unformatted text preview: float, since the float is always LF minus EF. We say that the activity is supercritical under that constraint. In this case, you will find that all activities on the original critical path now have the same negative float as the final activity and that those activities that originally had float now have it reduced by an amount equal to the negative float on the critical path. If those tasks had a total float less than the amount of the negative float on the supercritical path, then those activities also will become supercritical. Such an analysis allows you to determine exactly how much each task duration must be shortened. This can be done according to the procedures I discussed in a previous section of this chapter (adding resources, for example). Not all software allows you to do this analysis, but when it does, it helps you to see where the network must be adjusted. Previous Table of Contents Next www.erpvn.net Products | Contact Us | About Us | Privacy | Ad Info | Home Use of this site is subject to certain Terms & Conditions, Copyright © 1996-2000 EarthWeb Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction whole or in part in any form or medium without express written permission of EarthWeb is prohibited. Read EarthWeb's privacy statement. www.erpvn.net Fundamentals of Project Management by James P. Lewis AMACOM Books ISBN: 0814478352 Pub Date: 01/01/95 Search Tips Search this book: Advanced Search Previous Table of Contents Next Title EXERCISE For the network in Figure 6-5, calculate the early and late times and the float available on noncritical activities. Which activities form the critical path? Answers are in the Appendix. ----------- Figure 6-5 Network for exercise. Key Points to Remember • The critical path method is a way of locating the longest path through a project and determining how much latitude (commonly called float) is available on noncritical tasks. • Failure to consider resource allocation in scheduling usually yields a schedule that cannot be met. • A forward pass calculation is used to determine early times for activities, and a backward pass is used to find late times. • When an activity has no float, it is called a critical activity. Once the float available to a task is used up, that activity becomes critical. • Float can be used to compensate for estimating variability, unforeseen problems, and other causes of delay. • It is bad practice to schedule a project so that overtime is needed to meet original target dates, as this leaves no latitude for handling any problems that might occur later. Previous Table of Contents Next www.erpvn.net Products | Contact Us | About Us | Privacy | Ad Info | Home Use of this site is subject to certain Terms & Conditions, Copyright © 1996-2000 EarthWeb Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction whole or in part in any form or medium without express written permission of EarthWeb is prohibited. Read EarthWeb's privacy statement. www.erpvn.net Fundamentals of Project Management by James...
View Full Document

Ask a homework question - tutors are online