RevModPhys.85.751

RevModPhys.85.751 - REVIEWS OF MODERN PHYSICS VOLUME 85...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ion acceleration by superintense laser-plasma interaction Andrea Macchi * Istituto Nazionale di Ottica, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche (CNR/INO), U.O.S. ‘‘Adriano Gozzini,’’ Pisa, Italy, and Department of Physics ‘‘Enrico Fermi,’’ University of Pisa, Largo Bruno Pontecorvo 3, I-56127 Pisa, Italy Marco Borghesi Centre for Plasma Physics, The Queen’s University of Belfast, BT7 1NN Belfast, United Kingdom and Institute of Physics of the ASCR, ELI-Beamlines Project, Na Slovance 2, 18221 Prague, Czech Republic Matteo Passoni Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Via Ponzio 34/3, I-20133 Milan, Italy (published 10 May 2013) Ion acceleration driven by superintense laser pulses is attracting an impressive and steadily increasing effort. Motivations can be found in the applicative potential and in the perspective to investigate novel regimesasavailablelaserintensitieswillbeincreasing.Experimentshavedemonstrated,overawiderange of laser and target parameters, the generation of multi-MeV proton and ion beams with unique properties suchasultrashort duration, highbrilliance, andlow emittance.Anoverviewisgivenofthestateoftheartof ionaccelerationbylaserpulsesaswellasanoutlookonits futuredevelopmentandperspectives.Themain featuresobservedin the experiments, the observed scaling withlaser and plasma parameters, and the main models used both to interpret experimental data and to suggest new research directions are described. DOI: 10.1103/RevModPhys.85.751 PACS numbers: 52.38.Kd, 41.75.Jv, 52.27.Ny CONTENTS I. Introduction 751 II. Laser Ion Acceleration in a Nutshell 754 A. Laser interaction with overdense matter 754 B. Hot electrons 755 1. Heating models 755 2. Simulations, multidimensional effects, and simple estimates 757 3. Hot electron transport in solid matter 757 C. Ion acceleration mechanisms 758 1. Rear surface acceleration 758 2. Front surface acceleration 758 3. Acceleration schemes using innovative targetry 759 D. Particle-in-cell simulations 759 E. Ion diagnostics 760 III. Target Normal Sheath Acceleration 761 A. TNSA scenario: Main experimental observations 761 B. Characterization of beam properties 762 C. TNSA modeling 764 1. Quasistatic models 765 2. Plasma expansion into vacuum 766 3. Multispecies expansion 767 4. Numerical simulations 768 D. Comparison between models and experiments 768 E. Experimental optimization 770 1. Energy cutoff enhancement 770 2. Source spectrum manipulation 771 3. Staged acceleration and beam control 772 IV. Other Acceleration Mechanisms 773 A. Radiation pressure acceleration 773 1. Thick targets: Hole boring regime 773 2. Thin targets: Light sail regime 775 B. Collisionless shock acceleration 777 C. Transparency regime: Breakout afterburner 778 D. Acceleration in near-critical and underdense plasmas 779 E. Resistively enhanced acceleration 780 V. Current and Future Applications 780 A. Proton radiography 780 B. Production of warm dense matter 782 C. Fast ignition of fusion targets 783 D. Biomedical applications 784 E. Nuclear and particle physics 785 VI. Conclusions and Outlook 786 Acknowledgments 787 References 787 I. INTRODUCTION More than half a century ago, Veksler (1957) introduced
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 43

RevModPhys.85.751 - REVIEWS OF MODERN PHYSICS VOLUME 85...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online