Jonathan Edwards Homework

Or some loathsome insect over the

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Unformatted text preview: han explains God as being restrained and that His sovereign pleasure stops His wrath. 3. All of Jonathan Edwards’ passages instill a certain degree of fear into his audience. However, the levels and intensity of fear varies depending on the passage you are reading. For example, there are particular passages that are extremely fearful and would make anyone in the audience scared to sin. These passages can be found on pages 432, 436 and 439. On page 436, the number one passage explains the difference humans and God. It explains that God is absolutely omnipotent, having more power than any human could ever possibly have. It specifically uses a biblical quotation to explain this powerful wrath in Luke 12:4 ­5. This basically says that we should not fear humans who can inflict physical harm but rather, fear the One who can inflict an eternity of hell on humans. This can be viewed as very fearful because humans have not experienced the true wrath and power here, on Earth. Rather, we have experienced anger of superiors in society and fear them, who are in fact powerless compared to God. Jonathan Edwards actually uses the comparison of kings as “grasshoppers” to God. Due to this, humans have actually never experienced this kind of power from any king, for God’s wrath is far more powerful. This inflicts fear of the unknown. Another passage that is exceptionally fearful can be found on page 439. The passage numbered four explains God’s wrath as everlasting. Jonathan Edwards explains that experiencing God’s wrath once is enough to be suffered and dreadful. However, since God is eternal, this wrath would last us an eternity. This is extremely fearful because it describes that our suffering would be absolutely infinite and like nothing else we have experienced before. A third passage that I found extremely disturbing can be found on page 432. It is numbered five and mostly describes that the devil preys on us, waiting for us to sin. I personally found this fearful because people do not usually think that the devil is remotely present in our lives. However, Edwards explains that the devil is in fact always watching us, waiting for us to sin so he can take over our lives. These devils are simply waiting for us to fall so they can intercede our relationship with God and take us over. 4. Edwards’ speech could have benefited the community in a number of ways. For example, Edwards’ audience could take away many different things from his speeches depending on what type of person they were. If they were not Christian, his audience could possibly switch over to Christianity due to fear of a Godless life that we were leading. If his audience were sinners, they would turn their life around for the better and try their very hardest in order to not sin anymore. This could benefit society because there would be less crime and injustice within the community. On the contrary, Edwards could have also really turned people off from the Catholic religion due to his harshness and infliction of fear upon his audiences. People may have heard his sermons and decided that the Christian religion was too intense or fearful for them....
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This note was uploaded on 10/02/2013 for the course ENG 210 taught by Professor Mercier during the Summer '13 term at Marist.

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