{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Acid-Base Titrations and Buffered Solutions

Acid-Base Titrations and Buffered Solutions - Lecture XVIII...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Lecture XVIII Chem 002 Angel C. de Dios Acid-Base Titrations and Buffered Solutions Titrations In an acid-base titration, an aqueous solution containing a known concentration of base is slowly added (usually via a buret) to a flask containing an aqueous solution of an acid. A pH meter can be used to monitor the pH of the solution inside the flask as the base is being added. Strong Acid - Strong Base Titration This experiment is performed with an aqueous solution of a strong acid inside a flask (The pH of this solution is monitored as a function of the added volume of an aqueous solution of a strong base (NaOH, for example)). The figure drawn above can be divided into four regions: (a) the initial point - the pH at this point corresponds to the pH of an aqueous solution of a strong acid pH = -log [strong acid] (b) Strong acid region (before equivalence point) - in this region, one can predict the pH by simply calculating the remaining unreacted acid in the flask. pH = -log [ ((mmoles of acid) - (mmoles of base)) / (vol. acid + vol. base) ] (c) Equivalence point - at this point, mmoles acid = mmoles base added . Since the conjugate base of a
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
strong acid (Cl -
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 5

Acid-Base Titrations and Buffered Solutions - Lecture XVIII...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon bookmark
Ask a homework question - tutors are online