AP US IDS_ Unit 6 - UNIT 6 IDS January 4 2009 AP US P2 1 Amnesty Act of 1872 This act was a United States federal law that removed the restrictions and

AP US IDS_ Unit 6 - UNIT 6 IDS January 4 2009 AP US P2 1...

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UNIT 6 IDS: January 4, 2009 AP US P2 1. Amnesty Act of 1872: This act was a United States federal law that removed the restrictions and office holding disqualifications against most of the rebels in the Civil War. In other words, this act gave the right of office-holding back to many of the Southern rebels who had been previously excluded because of the 14th Amendment. This act affected more than 150,000 ex-Confederate troops who most likely would have voted for the Democrat party. As these ex-rebels gained more and more power, the focused on stripping the newly freed men of their new rights and liberties during the era of Reconstruction. However, this act was eventually rendered useless because of the number of African Americans voting. ( ) 2. Anaconda Plan: This plan was the strategy of the Union for the Civil War. It was the first plan set forth to attempt the crush the rebellion of the South and it was suggested by Union General-in-Chief Winfield Scott. Scott believed an effective blockade of Southern ports, a strong force down the Mississippi Valley with a large amount of troops, and the establishment of a line of strong Federal positions there would isolate the Confederacy. It was considered a “boa-constrictor” plan because it would squeeze the life out of the Confederacy. The plan was not adopted, but then in 1864, it reappeared with General Grant. Grant pressed the Confederates in Tennessee and Virginia, while Sherman marched through Georgia; thus squeezing the life out of the Confederacy as originally suggested. ( ) 3. Andrew Johnson: After President Lincoln was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth mere days after the Civil War was over, the task of presidency fell to Andrew Johnson at this hard time. He was a Southern Jacksonian Democrat and he firmly believed in states’ rights. However, the tactful Radical Republicans in Congress were firmly set against him. He had remained in the Senate even when Tennessee seceded, which made him a hero in the eyes of the Northerners and a traitor in the eyes of the Southerners. When president, he pardoned all who would take an oath of allegiance. Johnson vetoed the legislation of the Radical Republicans who tried to protect the newly freed men. He also violated the Tenure of Office Act, by dismissing Secretary of War Edwin M. Stanton. He was tried in the Senate in 1868, but was acquitted but one vote. He was one of the only two presidents to be impeached in American History. ( ) 4. Benjamin Wade: In 1836, Wade joined the Whig party and formed a partnership with a prominent anti- slavery figure in 1831. After the Whig party declined, he joined the Republican Party and was elected into the Senate. He joined forces with some Radical Republicans and he opposed the Fugitive Slave Act and the Kansas-Nebraska Act. He was one of the most radical politicians of his time; he supported women's suffrage, trade union rights, and equality for African-Americans. He was extremely critical of Lincoln

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