Supreme_Court_Cases_Handout.docx - Civil Liberties and...

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Civil Liberties and Civil Rights Supreme Court Cases SC Case Details of the Case (what was the story behind it, what was happening? Significance Useful links for more information (hyperlink it click the chain link at top) 1.Marbury v. Madison (1803) The Judiciary Act of 1801 created new courts and court positions, giving the president more control over the judiciary system. Under the Marshall court, William Marbury was appointed as Justice of the Peace in D.C. but his commission (warrant/authority that empowers individuals to execute official acts of the court, state, etc.) was left undelivered. Marbury then petitioned to have James Madison deliver his documents. This case asked the questions of: can plaintiffs due for their Established the principle of judicial review empowering the Supreme Court to nullify an act of the legislative or executive branch that violates the Constitution - 1850/5us137 - constitution/marbury-v-madison-video commissions? Can the Supreme Court order commissions to be delivered? The court ruled that it was illegal for Madison to fail to deliver the commission, but the Supreme Court could not force him to deliver it. The Judiciary Act of 1789 was ruled unconstitutional. This was a unanimous decision that established judicial review, which is a principle that enables the judicial branch to check the legislative branch. 2. McCulloch v. Maryland (1819) The court case known as McCulloch v. Maryland of March 6, 1819, was a seminal Supreme Court Case that affirmed the right of implied powers, that there were powers that the federal government had that were not specifically mentioned in the Constitution, but were implied by it. In addition, the Supreme Court found that states are not allowed to make laws that would interfere with congressional laws that are allowed by the Constitution. Declared that the United States government had implied powers as well as those specifically listed in the Constitution. As long as what is passed is not forbidden by the Constitution, it is allowed if it helps the federal government fulfill its powers as stated in the Constitution. McCulloch v. Maryland, 1819 (thoughtco.com) 3. Schenck v. the United States (1919) Upon entering the first World War, Congress passed an Act making it a crime to “willfully make or convey false reports or false statements” with intent to interfere with military success or “promote the success of its enemies” during wartime. In addition, the law prohibited willfully obstructing recruiting or enlisting services of the U.S., imposing penalties of up to twenty years imprisonment and $10,000. Schenck was indicted and charged with conspiracy to violate the Act after he mailed circulars criticizing the draft to draftees. In response, Schenck was convicted in federal district court for attempting to obstruct recruitment and cause insubordination.

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