Accident Report Project.docx - 1 Running Head AIRCRAFT...

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1 Running Head: AIRCRAFT ACCIDENT REPORT Aircraft Accident Report Muhammad Qamarul Anwar Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University
2 Running Head: AIRCRAFT ACCIDENT REPORT Abstract This paper will examine the findings and processes of an accident investigation on Zonk Air Charters, N517RL, Piper PA-31. On 7 November 2010, the aircraft crashed into a 100-foot communications tower. As a result, it collapsed and drags itself through the ground before it came to a halt and catch fire. A total of 5 people were killed from the accident of which, four of them are passengers and a chartered pilot. Evidence such as the cockpit and the cabin being crushed, indicating that this was a non-survivable accident. Subsequently, NTSB has deployed a "Go Team" to investigate the accident. The team consists of Jake Dillion, the Investigator in Charge (IIC) from NTSB. Alongside him are Shawn Bair, an engine representative, and Dawn Smith, an airframe representative. All of them are experts in their field. The findings of the investigation will be presented in parts and at the end of the paper, including probable causes and recommendations. Keywords: Zonk Air, NTSB, FAA, Human Error, SHELL
3 Running Head: AIRCRAFT ACCIDENT REPORT Aircraft Accident Report Brief history of Flight On 7 November 2010, a 1980 Piper PA-31-310 twin-engine turboprop operated by Zonk Air Charters crashed after departing from Tahoe Airport (KTVL) at dusk. The aircraft registration number for the aircraft was N517RL and the purpose of the flight was to take the passengers up for sunset photos. According to the flight manual, the flight was supposedly within 20 miles of the airport with a return to the same airport or with an option to continue to Burbank, CA. The flight departed under Visual Flight Rules (VFR) and Visual Meteorological Conditions (VMC). There were 4 passengers and a chartered pilot on the flight. Just 5 miles from where the aircraft took off, it was seen in a steep left "rolling like" bank with trailing smoke. Subsequently, the aircraft wing collided with the top of a 100-foot communications tower and crashed. The plane dragged through the ground and came to rest 50 feet from the point of impact. There were no survivors. On-Scene Actions (Scene Management Procedures) The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is the agency responsible for investigating all U.S. Civil aircraft accidents and determine the probable cause. (Lawin, 2014). The head investigator, Jake Dillion from NTSB and parties of the investigation, Shawn Bair and Dawn Smith, have followed standard NTSB investigation procedures stated in Part 830 in title 49, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) (Lawin, 2014). They are responsible for fact-finding and uncovering evidence on the ground. Command Post, Bio-Hazard Suits, Security Teams, and Communications are set up to facilitate the investigations. Besides collecting evidence such as burnt samples or photographic evidence, NTSB has liaised with the respective authorities related to the accident (BHAG Trial Lawyers, 2018). This includes the police county or federal departments to cordon the crash site and places of impact to

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