amhist - American History from 1877 The New Working Classes...

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29/01/2008 11:55:00 The New Working Classes I.      Introduction The gilded age was the most violent of times in American history; each region  had its own brand.  The 19 th  century was a period of labor strife, exemplified by  the “Great Strike.”  By the end of the strike, workers were setting railroad cars on  fire, tearing up tracks; the militia was called to quelch the violence.  1886 saw  over 1500 work stoppages; from then until 1900, only one year saw less than  1000 work stoppages. II.     The South        A.      General Conditions States were slowly returning to the Union, and could only after ratifying the  14 th  amendment.  Some rejoined as late as 1876 or later.        B.      Aftermath of Slavery: Sharecroppers and Tenant Farmers Free men were left without homes, food, and clothing—all provided for  them as slaves.  This new influx of impoverished people, as well as the  Civil War in general, left the South in economic turmoil. o Tenant farmers and Sharecroppers continued to work in the  fields; prices of cotton began to fall, and the workers got less  money [=more debt] for their work.        C.      "The New South"
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This note was uploaded on 04/07/2008 for the course HIST 152 taught by Professor Hoeveler during the Spring '08 term at Wisconsin Milwaukee.

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amhist - American History from 1877 The New Working Classes...

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