Bacterial Growth and Inhibition - Part 1.docx - Bacteria...

This preview shows page 1 - 2 out of 5 pages.

Bacteria Growth and Inhibition (Part 1) Procedures adapted from: Microbiology Experiments, 4 th edition. J. Kleyn and M. Bicknell. McGraw-Hill, 2004. Microbiological Applications , 7 th edition. H.J. Benson. McGraw-Hill, 1998. Biology 2051 Laboratory Manual , 9 th edition. Hayden-McNeil. Overview : Microbiology is the study of microbes – microorganisms and infectious agents that are too small to be examined with the naked eye. Microbes include prokaryotic organisms (i.e., bacteria and archaea), some eukaryotic organisms (i.e., mites, fungi, and protozoa), and nonliving infectious particles such as viruses. Microbes are ubiquitous and can be found in virtually every environment on Earth. Part A : You will test the effectiveness of two different handwashing techniques on microbial population sizes. Part B : You will describe microbial colonies. Part C : You will learn about bacteria’s rapid reproduction rate via binary fission. Our hands can transfer various bacterial, viral, and fungal diseases to other objects and people. We remove these harmful microorganisms and prevent the spread of disease through the act of washing our hands. The number of individual microorganisms required to cause infection and disease in a person is called the infectious dose . According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, hand washing is one of the most important means of preventing the spread of infection. Not all microorganisms are harmful. In fact, many microorganisms are neutral, or even beneficial, to humans. Normal or resident microbiota (flora) establish themselves, survive, and multiply on or in the body, but do not produce disease under normal conditions. Washing hands sloughs off the dead outermost layers of the skin and may expose the normal flora. Opportunistic pathogens are members of one’s normal flora that become pathogenic (causing disease) when the opportunity arises; an organism that is normally considered harmless on the skin may cause disease if introduced into the bloodstream. Transient microbiota (flora) may be present on the body temporarily but do not become fully entrenched. Transient microbiota come into contact with skin constantly, but most organisms are unable to multiply there and will die. In a clinical setting, proper

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture