2011L Lec7 Annelida Spr08

2011L Lec7 Annelida Spr08 - Phylum Annelida The segmented...

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Unformatted text preview: Phylum Annelida The segmented worms QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. annelids include polychaetes, earthworms, leeches, spoonworms, and beardworms with ~15,300 living and ~200 fossil species bilaterally symmetric; range from about 0.5 mm to 3 m long QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. spoon worm QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. beard worm QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. occur in terrestrial, freshwater and marine environments burrow into or swim across the substrate Predators or scavengers (feeding on the surrounding substrate) Annelids have an extensive fossil record back to the Cambrian QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. Canadia Cambrian fossil from Burgess Shale serpulid fossil tubes Cambrian fossil trochophore larvae discovered 1998 Annelids are important in marine ecosystems:- involved in nutrient redistribution through burrowing- help convert organic debris into CO 2 , which is transported to the surface dissolved in water- marine phytoplankton take up the CO 2 and produce sugars, releasing O 2 QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. Sabellidae QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. Sabellidae QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. serpulid tube worm Eunice sp. QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. Leeches important in medicine Used for blood letting 2,500 years ago in India, Greece and Egypt Hippocrates (5th C B.C.) refers to using leeches to balance the humors In 1830s, blood letting became popular in Europe Still used to dissipate blood clots after severe injury: leech saliva contains anaesthetic, the anti-coagulant...
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2008 for the course BIO bsc2011L taught by Professor Spears during the Spring '08 term at FSU.

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2011L Lec7 Annelida Spr08 - Phylum Annelida The segmented...

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