Castro and the US Teacher Materials.pdf - Castro and the...

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STANFORD HISTORY EDUCATION GROUP sheg.stanford.edu Castro and the United States Lesson Plan Central Historical Question: How did Fidel Castro view the United States? Materials: Castro and the U.S. PowerPoint Copies of Documents A & B Copies of Timeline Copies of Corroboration Chart Common Core State Standards for Literacy in History/Social Studies: #1 (Gr. 6 - 12) , #6 (Gr. 6 - 12) , #9 (Gr. 6 - 12) Plan of Instruction: Note: Students should be familiar with the context of the Cold War before beginning this lesson. 1. Use the PowerPoint to review background information about the Cuban Revolution. (If your students are familiar with this background information, skip to slide 7 and focus on the events in the timeline.) a. Slide 2: Spanish Colony . The first Spanish settlement was established in Cuba in 1511. Cuba slowly grew into a large world supplier of sugar cane. b. Slide 3: Wars for Independence. In 1868 and 1879, Cubans made attempts (eventually unsuccessful) to gain their independence from Spain. In 1895, another attempt at independence began. In 1898, the U.S. joined the war on the side of the Cubans. By December 1898, Spain gave up control of Cuba. c. Slide 4: Independence. The U.S. took control and ruled Cuba through a military government. By 1902 , Cuba achieved full independence; however, the U.S. was still allowed to intervene, particularly in economic or foreign affairs. Many American companies, especially agricultural and sugar companies, operated in Cuba. d. Slide 5: Batista Takes Power. In 1933, Fulgencio Batista came to power in Cuba after a massive labor strike motivated by government corruption. During his 26-year rule, Batista implemented some progressive social and economic reforms but later suspended these. Government corruption and brutality grew over time during his administration. The number of American companies operating in Cuba, particularly in the sugar industry, grew, and the U.S. supported Batista until 1958.
STANFORD HISTORY EDUCATION GROUP sheg.stanford.edu e. Slide 6: Attack on Moncada Army Barracks. On July 26, 1953, Fidel Castro, who was educated as a lawyer and became part of a group critical of Batista, led an attack on the Moncada Army Barracks. The group became known as the 26 th of July movement; its goals were to overthrow Batista and carry out progressive reforms in Cuba. Castro was arrested and put in jail. He was released in 1955 and moved to Mexico to continue building support for his movement against Batista.

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