pubh_6009_week_8_8.6.1group_interviewing.pdf - 8.6.1Group...

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8.6.1Group Interviewing
Focus Groups “A focus group is the use of group interaction to produce data and in sights that would be less accessible without the interaction found in a group .” —Morgan (1988)
Types of Group Interviewing Natural groups: groups of people who preexist the research interview For example, households, workplace, micro-credit members Community interviews: a participatory method meant to encourage active participation by community members Empower participants For example, villages, slum areas—beneficiaries Consensus panels: specifically used to reach agreement Sometimes used to facilitate agreement For example, Delphi, nominal Focus groups
Group Interviewing Mixes observation and interviewing Overlaps with individual interviewing (more) and with participant observation (less) Opportunity to gather data on interactions, group dynamics, and “natural” vocabulary Less emphasis on interaction between researcher and participant and more on that among participants
Group Interviewing Strengths Good for accessing cultural norms and standards Good for data on whats and whys—for interpreting descriptive statistics Good for generating hypotheses Provides data on group interactions Weaknesses Not as good for exploring marginalized, less acceptable views Hierarchies and social dominance can be intensified Not as good for predicting individual behaviors or eliciting individual beliefs
Different Ways to View Groups What is a community?
Different Ways to Use Group Interviewing Natural group interviews to gather data on bed-net use for malaria prevention Community interviews to gather data on how best to distribute bed nets Nominal groups to reach consensus on adapting new treatment protocols using ACTs to the local context
Focus Groups Derives from marketing research Small, preselected group brought together by researcher Participants should not know each other prior Moderated or facilitated by the researcher Focuses on a specific topic or issue Uses a list of topics and questions—the same for each group Groups should be homogeneous on one or two background variables of interest

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