Could this be a universal law yes but if it were and

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Unformatted text preview: to borrow money. •  So false promising can’t be universal, and therefore can’t be moral. Another Immoral AcOon: Failing to Help the Needy •  Suppose that a given poor person will die unless he receives $5 for medical care, but I refuse to give him the money for it. –  My maxim is something like “When someone needs help, I will refuse to make any sacrifices in order to provide it, in order to maximize my own well ­being.” •  Could this be a universal law? Yes, but if it were, and if I ever needed help, I wouldn’t receive the help I needed. •  My expected well ­being is higher in a universe where it’s a universal law that people help the needy than in a universe where it’s a universal law that people don’t help the needy. –  And we know I care about well ­being since that was the stated goal of my maxim. So this maxim could be a universal law, but I can’t will it to be a universal law. Perfect vs. Imperfect DuOes •  You have a “perfect” duty to refrain from acOons that are impossible for everyone to take. –  Morality requires you to always obey your perfect duOes. •  You have an “imperfect” duty to refrain from acOons that are possible for everyone to take but that you can’t want everyone to take. –  Morality requires you to generally obey your imperfect duOes, but not necessarily at every moment. 2 Ethics 9/13/2012 Table of Kant’s Examples •  In the text you’ll be reading, Kant gives a total of four examples; the two already discussed, and two involving duOes to oneself: DuOes to Self DuOes to Others Perfect DuOes Don’t commit suicide selfishly. (If everyone reacted to hardship by dying rather than overcoming it, y...
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