Isaac Storm - *Lone Star College System 1302 U.S History...

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*Lone Star College System*1302 U.S. HistoryMrs. Kelly Schimmle Oct 7, 2009Paper Assignment 1 — Isaac’s StromThe late 1800s and 1900s, were times of great confidence in ability of American when Americans were ready to conquer the nature. This is one of the best resources to understand the story Isaac’s Storm, a man, a time, and the deadliest hurricane in history by Erik Larson. Isaac Monroe Cline was the chief of U.S. Bureau, arrived in Galveston to open the Texas Section which was located on Levy Building. Isaac found himself waking to a persistent sense of something gone wrong. Isaac personally had encountered and explained some of the strangest atmosphere phenomena a weatherman could ever hope to experience, but also read the work of the most celebrated meteorologists and physical geographers of the nineteenth century, men like Henry Piddington, Matthew Fontaine Maury, William Redfield, and James Espy, and he had followed their celebrated hunt for the Law of Storm. The time when Isaac’s Strom came on Friday evening, September 8, 1900, many of the thousands of residents of Galveston, Texas within 48 hours; at least 10,000 of the town people were going to dead, victims of the single worst natural disaster in U.S. history. Galveston was too pretty, too progressive, and prosperous – entirely too hopeful to be true Travelers arriving by ship saw the city as a silvery fairy kingdom that might just as suddenly disappear from sight. Few people were aware that the deadliest natural disaster in the United States was the hurricane that hit Galveston Island on September 8, 1900. Isaac had begun tracking the storm from the Cape Verde Basin off the western coast of Africa. In the month of August 27, storm entered the Caribbean Sea and began to increase in size. The hurricane passed north of Cuba, and in the middle of September storm entered the Gulf

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