Lab 3 write up

Lab 3 write up - Evolution Comparative Proteomics Scott Buckley Section 15 19 September 2006 Introduction Muscle tissue is a necessity for movement

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Evolution: Comparative Proteomics Scott Buckley Section 15 19 September 2006
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Introduction: Muscle tissue is a necessity for movement of organisms today. According to Harrison, it is used for transportation, the storing and moving of substances within the body, heat production, and the maintenance of posture. It is made up of three main components: Epimysium, Perimycium, and Endomycium. The epimysium is the fibrous connective tissue on the outer most layer of a muscle. The perimycium divides the larger sections into smaller groups. These are also known as fascicles. The job of the endomycium is to cover single cells, but within the cells lay more structures (Harrison). There are long cylinders that run the long way through a cell called myofibrils. There can be anywhere from one hundred to several thousands of myofibrils in a muscle cell. The myofibrils contain myofilaments, which hold protein for energy to contract. The thick myofibrils have myosin, while the thinner ones have actin, troponin, and tropomyosin (Harrison). The groups Chondricthyes, Osteicthyes, Sarcopterygians, and Actinoptygerians are all classifications of fish. In general, they have one thing in common, a hard, somewhat cartilaginous skeleton, have a jaw, have scales, and are predatory. Brown states that the Chondricthyes are more cartilage-like than the others, while Osteichthys on the other hand, are more boney. Actinopterygians have fins that are strong because of an endoskeletal support. Sarcopterygians have massive fins supported by bone also, but there is muscle built on the fin to make it appear as massive as it is (Reisz). According to Leady, proteomics is defined as the study of proteins (2005, p. 21). The tree that was given to us supports the relation of fish through proteins. By having to choose from different branches, we were ensured of the differences in protein bands among the fish. The following list of fish is I predicted to be most related to least related
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to the flounder: perch; pike; carp; sturgeon; shark. By the studying the similarities among the bands, I can predict that the flounder will share the most bands with the perch or pike and share the least bands with the sturgeon or shark. Methods: The procedure used to determine the protein band similarity in the fish is called electrophoresis. The muscle sample cut from the one of the three fish is inserted into a bullet tube along with a Laemelli sample buffer to ensure proper dying. A cap is placed on top and the tubes are heated at 95 C for five minutes. A sample of 10 ul from each tube is then put into the electrophoresis chamber. An electric current of 200V is then run
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2008 for the course BIOL 2150 taught by Professor Koscynski during the Spring '08 term at Toledo.

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Lab 3 write up - Evolution Comparative Proteomics Scott Buckley Section 15 19 September 2006 Introduction Muscle tissue is a necessity for movement

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