620 assignment 1.docx - Assignment 1 Organizational Structure 1 Assignment 1 Organizational Structure Andrew J Hall Helms School of Government Liberty

620 assignment 1.docx - Assignment 1 Organizational...

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 9 pages.

Assignment 1: Organizational Structure 1 Assignment 1: Organizational Structure Andrew J. Hall Helms School of Government, Liberty University Author Note Andrew J. Hall I have no known conflict of interest to disclose. Correspondence concerning this article should be addressed to Andrew J. Hall Email: [email protected] Organizational Structure
Assignment 1: Organizational Structure 2 Introduction A career or vocation within public service and administration requires dedication and motivation. It is a job that is often relegated as a thankless job, often receiving the brunt of backlash from the public, usually is compensated far less (in comparison to their private counterparts) and is under constant scrutiny. This narrative is more often the case for those in the more prolific, public, and/or vocal positions, but nevertheless this rhetoric is felt throughout all levels of a public administration organization. Lower-level employees thrive on internal and external motivations that give purpose and vision, and ultimately workplace enjoyment. It is this motivation that ultimately leads to increased productivity, an improvement in management methods, accountability, and how the public views and trusts the government (Moynihan and Pandey, 2007, para. 6). All organizations (both private and public) need an organizational design and structure that is clearly defined. A hierarchy of leadership, roles, expectations, and outcomes need to be well-defined and executed for any measure of efficiency and effectiveness. This is true for the motivation of the worker as well. Many theorists and businessman alike have made numerous studies and attempts to best execute which organizational structure is the most proactive, meaningful, and motivating over the years. Organizational structure design efforts aim to succeed in their organizational goals and are often the key to the success or failure of an organization or administration. Amongst these designs, this paper will explore three different models of organizational design namely the bureaucratic, matrix, and team model. This paper will explain the major differences of each model and how they may be utilized within public administration, along with how each model effects public service motivation. Lastly this paper will evaluate each organizational structure in the context of a biblical worldview, and how a Christian should view organizational structure and service motivation. Models of Organizational Design in Public Administration
Assignment 1: Organizational Structure 3 Bureaucratic model The Bureaucratic Model of Organization is a paradigm that really began to flourish during the late eighteenth and nineteenth century amid the onset of the industrial revolution (Dresang, 2017, p.40). German Sociologist, Max Weber, established the fundamentals of the Bureaucratic Model for social organization. “Weber’s model was intended to identify the components of a well-structured government bureaucracy (Milakovich & Gordon, 2013, p.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture