final High-definition paper

final High-definition paper - History of HD Format 1 The...

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 History of HD Format 1 The history of HD Format Mauricio Perez, Jake Schafer, Sean Trank, Justin Hagan Communication 350, Section 1 Dr. Greer January 24, 2008
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 History of HD Format 2 The history of HD Format: History of HD from Inception through 1988 When one thinks of High Definition, one would usually think of a 50 inch sleek plasma TV with 1920x1080 lines of resolution (1080p) and a development timeline of roughly 10 years or so. What many may not realize is that “high def” as we know it today has been in development since the 1970’s and as a whole, HD has been developing and expanding since the 1930’s. High def in those days of course meant something much different that 720p, 1080p or i, or even 480p for that matter. In 1935, a committee created by the British Parliament came to the conclusion that HD should have no fewer than 240 lines of resolution (Schubin). The reasoning for this comes from the notion that up until that point, the resolution on sets was very low, so any resolution that was all of a sudden doubled was coined as having “High Definition.” Over the next 5 years, high def would be getting a definition adjustment. Eventually, 240 lines became common and became the new “Standard definition” and this gave way to sets capable of 405 lines and in 1936, Britain’s sets capable of 625 lines of resolution. In 1939, the more common 441 line TV gave way to 525 line TV which was introduced at the 1939 World’s Fair. The 525 and 625 line TV sets essentially became the world’s first “HDTV” sets (Schubin). It wasn’t until the 1980’s where HD as we know it today became a closer reality. In 1981, Japanese Broadcasting Corp. was creating a frenzy over its TV sets outputting 1,125 lines of resolution. In February, the US got its first demonstrations at the Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers conference in San Francisco (Brown). In 1985, HD got its first official specifications from the Advanced Television Services Committee (ATSC) and are as follows:
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 History of HD Format 3 1,125 lines, 60 fields, 2:1 interlace, and a 5.33:3 ratio. In September 1988, the FCC set forth some rules where HD broadcasts needed to be compatible with NTSC standards and be sent through UHF and/or VHF frequencies (Schubin). Over the next few years, TV stations would slowly begin to show programs in HD and set the framework for HD as we know it today and its influence in movie and gaming hardware. Early Formats
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final High-definition paper - History of HD Format 1 The...

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