The largest individual particles shown are a few

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Unformatted text preview: e view from within the rings 33 In 1859, James Clerk Maxwell demonstrated that the rings could not be solid or they would become unstable and break apart. He proposed that the rings must be composed of numerous small particles, all independently orbiting Saturn. This is an artist concept of a close-up view of Saturn's ring particles. The planet Saturn is seen in the background (yellow and brown). The particles (blue) are composed mostly of ice, but are not uniform. They clump together to form elongated, curved aggregates, continually forming and dispersing. The space between the clumps is mostly empty. The largest individual particles shown are a few meters (yards) across. Saturn’s Major Rings ‣ Main Rings ‣A & B rings - densest rings, separated by Cassini Division ‣ C ring - wide, faint ring inside B ring ‣ Dusty Rings ‣D ring - innermost ring; small dusty particles ‣F ring - narrow ring outside the A ring The rings of Saturn, with the major rings labelled 34 The densest parts of the Saturnian ring system are the A and B Rings, which are separated by the Cassini Division. Along with the C Ring, the...
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This note was uploaded on 10/23/2013 for the course ASTR 100 taught by Professor Dunne during the Fall '12 term at University of Illinois, Urbana Champaign.

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