ENGL101 Course Policies and Syllabus, Fall 2007

ENGL101 Course Policies and Syllabus, Fall 2007 - English...

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English 101: Composition and Rhetoric Section 001, Fall 2007 MWF, 0800-0850, HU 405 Instructor: Ms. Norma Honaker Office Hours: MW, 0900-0950 and by Office: HU 416 appointment with 24 hours notice Office Phone: 777-8114 Email: honakern@mailbox.sc.edu Mailbox: On the first floor of the Humanities Office Building (Box #46) Course Description English 101 is designed to help make you a better, more effective writer and a more critical thinker and reader. Toward this end, you will spend the semester learning theories of argumentation and analysis, and you will practice generating and developing your own ideas. Through drafting and revision, you will construct reasoned, well- supported written arguments on a variety of academic and public topics that you will explore with your classmates and me. This course will also prepare you to enter public debate about important civic and social issues by teaching you to read critically, do research and document source materials correctly, and develop a clean, effective writing style that is free of major errors. Materials You must purchase the following for this course: Bauknight, Lee, ed. The Carolina Reader, 2007-2008 . Pearson Custom Publishing, 2007. Wood, Nancy. Essentials of Argument, University of South Carolina Edition . Pearson Custom Publishing, 2007. Hairston, Maxine, John Ruszkiewicz, and Christy Friend. Scott Foresman Handbook, 8 th ed . Prentice Hall, 2006. A disk, jump drive, or some other kind of storage device on which you will save copies of your work. You should bring all three books, and you may wish to purchase a college-level dictionary. Assignments Over the course of the semester you will work on four major assignments that you will revise, polish, and collect in a portfolio to be submitted to me at the end of the semester (see the “Revision” section below for further details). Though you must complete each draft of your major assignments by the appropriate due date (or incur a grade penalty), you will receive a grade only on the final drafts. You will also be graded on Short Writing Assignments, quizzes, and a final exam essay. Here are the details: 1. Essays (70%) Rhetorical Analysis (print text): 3-4 pages, or 750-1000 words (10%) Rhetorical Analysis (visual text): 3-4 pages, or 750-1000 words (10%) Exploratory Essay: 5-7 pages, or 1250-1750 words (20%) Policy Argument: 5-7 pages, or 1250-1750 words (20%) Final Exam: 3-4 pages, or 750-1000 words (10%). See “Final Exam,” below.* 2. Annotated Bibliography (10%) Because research, the use of sources, and documentation will play a central role in our class this semester—and your college career—you will compose and revise an annotated bibliography of sources that you’ll use in your Exploratory and Policy essays. 3.
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ENGL101 Course Policies and Syllabus, Fall 2007 - English...

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