arh312exam2

arh312exam2 - Carolingian Palace of Ramiro I (Santa Maria...

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Carolingian Palace of Ramiro I (Santa Maria de Naranco), Oviedo, Spain, c. 840 - pleasure palace outside the city - buttresses along exterior - b/c of the barrel-vaulted building - first really successful use to this extent - 2 stories - 1 st : practical space (kitchen, store-rooms) - 2 nd : for the royalty to hang - not quite ashlar stonework (mostly rubble) - all windows - indicates supreme confidence (cuz anyone can break a window) - open loggias at each end - got converted to a church right away - detail carved directly into the stone - barrel-vault with transverse arches - details carved btw arches (medallions) - capitals have rope motif - animals and human figures - not historiated (not telling a story…they’re just decoration) - they wanted to be the new Roman Empire - wanted to create an impressive palace complex that would add to his prestige and give a home to his court Palace Chapel of Charlemagne (Aix la Chapel), Aachen, Germany, c. 820 - Charlemagne
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- very powerful - had different ideas about how to recreate the Roman Empire - went out of his way to get Roman spolia for this chapel - named Emperor in 800 by the Pope - he didn’t like this cuz it meant he was under the pope - and at the same time there was a self-declared Roman emperor in Constantinople - he began construction even before he was crowned emperor - only thing that survives is the chapel, and not even all of it - private chapel - centrally planned octagon, supporting a dome - been added to over the years - bronze doors w/ lion door knockers - interior - bronze screens along second floor - lots of Roman spolia - lost of marble (columns with Corinthian capitals) - throne still survives - might be a copy - a lot of his stuff got reused - white slab marble - actually also a reliquary - used his religion to support his power - set up monasteries all over his land - placed his family members in charge of them - originally part of a large complex of palace structures - modeled after the palace churches in Rome and Constantinople - especially the palace church of Justinian in Ravenna, San Vitale Torhalle (gatehouse) of Lorsch, Germany, c. 800 - the second of 3 to get to the actual church - resembles a triumphal arch - triumph now is the religious ruler (Jesus) - perfect blending of the Roman/Barbarian aesthetics = Carolingian - tile pattern is reminiscent of Northern metalwork - fresco decorations in the upper interior inspired by classical tradition - arcading has points, not arches - would have had multiple altars
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- b/c all had to have a relic of a saint to make it a real altar - and he had a good bond with the pope so he got a lot of good relics - built as an independent station for imperial ceremonies - served as a sort of waiting room during the visit of the emperor Plan of St. Gall, Switzerland, c. 820 - writing is the life of St. Martin (on the back) - which is the only reason the plan survives - 5 pieces of parchment sewn together - only complete surviving ground plan for all medieval churches - plans for the “perfect” Carolingian monastery
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arh312exam2 - Carolingian Palace of Ramiro I (Santa Maria...

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