Arh415midterm - Vasari Perseus and Andromeda 1570-72 Renaissance The legend states that when Perseus held up the head of Medusa and plunged his

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Vasari, Perseus and Andromeda, 1570-72, Renaissance - The legend states that when Perseus held up the head of Medusa and plunged his sword into the dragon that was about to attack Andromeda, the dragon turned to stone and its blood, streaming through the water, turned to coral. - In the background, stylized promontories sparkle with classical buildings, and on the beach workmen draw the dragon onto land with a huge winch. - decoration in the Palazzo Vecchio, in Florence - mannerist in style (late) - he was the first Italian art historian - wrote a book of artist biographies - “Lives of the most excellent painters, sculptors, and architects” - coined the term “renaissance” in print - he was also an architect Vasari, Allegory of the Immaculate Conception, 1541 - studied under Michelangelo Mannerism - deformed figures (elongation) - focus is not central - spatially illogical - figure’s gestures and expressions don’t tell the story - actually they confuse it more - not paying much attention to nature (if looking at it at all) - artificial colors - as opposed to naturalism - “subjective beauty” that exists only in the mind - playful with touches of eroticism
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(Compared to Baroque) - dramatic, theatrical diagonals - realism (down to earth, natural, everyday life) - classicism - huge focus on patronage - the Counter Reformation has huge impact - catholic church is trying to reform and become more attractive - notion of the ideal (if you can make it perfect then why not) - perspective (convention for portraying space…rational) - union between form and content - observation of nature (but not raw nature) - filtered through the code of representation - always pretty, never spontaneous - utopian, simplistic - no room for conflict or subjective representation Salviati, Charity, 1554-58 - Florentine painter (mannerist) - did some work for the Medici family - fills the space with bodies fairly close to the picture plane - but still allows for sufficient room for the figures to make complex movements - elaborate in his treatment of volumes Michelangelo, Conversion of St. Paul, Pauline Chapel, Vatican, 1542-50, Renaissance - began work here as soon as he finished the Sistine chapel - patron of the chapel was Paul Farnese (so the subject was prob requested) - shows Paul being thrown from his horse during his trip from Jerusalem to Damascus
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- it’s very busy with lots of figures - light colors - Paul isn’t really the central focus (it’s too jumbled) - God is striking him off his horse with a bolt of lightning Tibaldi, Adoration of the Shepherds, 1549 - during the decline of mannerism (maniera) - thread of eroticism - means artificial or mannered in Italian - artist’s desire to impress the audience - skill at foreshortening figures, creating bizarre juxtapositions of scale and color, highly refined treatment of materials - focus on artistic achievement over subject matter - characteristic example of overreaction to Michelangelo’s impressive male nudes (as in the Sistine chapel) - twisted, unnatural poses in all the male figures
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This note was uploaded on 04/08/2008 for the course ARH 415 taught by Professor Plax during the Spring '08 term at University of Arizona- Tucson.

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Arh415midterm - Vasari Perseus and Andromeda 1570-72 Renaissance The legend states that when Perseus held up the head of Medusa and plunged his

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