Appeasement DA 2 - Michigan7 2013

Thesurpriseformanyobserverswasthatthelatestshipmentofa

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Unformatted text preview: airs. (Richard – Brookings “The New Cuban Economy: What Roles for Foreign Investment?” December 2012 http://www.brookings.edu/research/papers/2012/12/cuba­economy­feinberg)//EB The Cuban revolution defined itself in large measure in terms of what it was not: not a dependency of the United States; not a dominion governed by global corporations; not a liberal, market­driven economy. As the guerrilla army made its triumphal entry into Havana and the infant revolution shifted leftward, a hallmark of its anti­imperialist ethos became the loudly proclaimed nationalizations of the U.S.­based firms that had controlled many key sectors of the Cuban economy, including hotels and gambling casinos, public utilities, oil refineries, and the rich sugar mills. In the strategic conflict with the United States, the “historic enemy,” the revolution consolidated its power through the excision of the U.S. economic presence. For revolutionary Cuba, foreign investment has been about more than dollars and cents. It’s about cultural identity and national...
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This note was uploaded on 10/27/2013 for the course DEBATE 101 taught by Professor None during the Summer '12 term at University of California, Berkeley.

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