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Synthesis Free Response Question AP Language and Composition (50 points) As the Internet age changes what and how people read, there has been considerable debate about the future of public libraries. While some commentators question whether libraries can stay relevant, others see new possibilities for libraries in the changing dynamics of today’s society. Carefully read the following six sources, including the introductory information for each source. Then synthesize material from at least three of the sources and incorporate it into a coherent, well written essay in which you develop a position on the role, if any, public libraries should serve in the future. Your argument should be the focus of your essay. Use the sources to develop your argument and explain your reasoning for it. Avoid merely summarizing the sources. Indicated clearly which sources you are drawing, from whether it be direct quotation, paraphrase, or summary. You may cite the sources as Source A, Source B, etc., or by using the descriptions in parentheses. Source A (Kranich) Source B (calendar) Source C (Shank) Source D (charts) Source E (Siegler) Source F (ALA)
Source A Kranish, Nancy. Interview by Cecilia M. Orphan. American Democracy Project Blog . American Democracy Project, 4 January 2011. Web. 27 June 2014. The following is excerpted from an interview with Nancy Kranich, former President of the American Library Association (AL), the main professional organization for librarians in the United States. An informed public constitutes the very foundation of a democracy; after all, democracies are about discourse – discourse among the people. If a free society is to survive, it must ensure the preservation of its records and provide free and open access to this information to all its citizens. It must ensure that citizens have the skills necessary to participate in the democratic process. It must allow unfettered dialogue and guarantee freedom of expression. All of this is done in our libraries, the cornerstone of democracy in our communities. Benjamin Franklin founded the first public lending library in the 1730’s. His novel idea of sharing information resources was a radical one. In the rest of the civilized world libraries were the property of the ruling classes and religion. The first significant tax-supported public libraries were organized in the mid-19th century, conceived as supplements to the public schools as well as “civilizing agents and objects of civic pride in a raw new country.” (Molz and Dain 1999, p. 3). … Sidney Ditzion (1947, p. 74) noted that late nineteenth century public libraries continued “the educational process where the schools left off and by conducting a people’s university, a wholesome capable citizenry would be fully schooled in the conduct of a democratic life.” By the 1920’s, Learned (1924) popularized the idea of libraries as informal education centers, followed by an American Library Association (ALA) report establishing a Board on Library and Adult Education. (Keith 2007, p, 244). During

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