chap004_review

chap004_review - Chapter 4 - Litigation True/False...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 4 - Litigation True/False Questions 2. If a defendant alleges that there cannot be a complete determination of a controversy without the presence of other parties, he may bring in the new parties who are called third-party defendants. Ans: True Level: Medium Page: 95 5. Class action suits may only be brought in federal court. Ans: False Level: Hard Page: 100 6. Evidence in the form of a sworn statement is called an affidavit. Ans: True Level: Medium Page: 108 7. Challenges for cause are also called peremptory challenges. Ans: False Level: Medium Page: 111 9. Personal jurisdiction over the defendant is automatically obtained when the plaintiff files the complaint. Ans: False Level: Medium Page: 98 11. One method of discovery, called depositions, involves written questions for the opposing parties to answer. Ans: False Level: Medium Page: 104 12. A statute of limitations determines the maximum amount of money that a plaintiff may sue for. Ans: False Level: Medium Page: 108 13. Discovery procedures are intended to be used freely by the parties to litigation without the court's direct supervision. Ans: True Level: Medium Page: 104 20. The plaintiff in a civil case must prove his case beyond a reasonable doubt. Ans: False Level: Easy Page: 116 Reed, The Legal & Regulatory Environment of Business, 14/e 1
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Chapter 4 - Litigation Multiple Choice Questions 21. Which of the following is a feature of appellate review: A) Calling witnesses. B) Oral argument. C) Introduction of new evidence. D) All of the above are part of typical appellate review procedures. Ans: B Level: Medium Page: 118 22. Typically, the winner at the trial court level is called the ________ on appeal. A) Appellee. B) Appellant. C) Counterplaintiff. D) Third Party. Ans: A Level: Easy Page: 117 23. To have standing to sue, the plaintiff must prove: I. A case or controversy. II. A personal stake in the resolution. III. At least $100,000 in damages. A)
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 6

chap004_review - Chapter 4 - Litigation True/False...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online