Advice on Youth Satire Analysis(1) (2).docx - u201cAdvice...

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“Advice on Youth” Satire Analysis Part I Annotate the passage below with these steps in mind: 1) Detect the target . a. Is it a vice or folly? For example, greed, self-righteousness, arrogance, racism, prejudice, ignorance? b. Is it some kind of abuse or corruption? For example, exploitation of workers, inaction in congress, corruption of political figures? 2) Examine the content – Is it silly? Does it concern major issues? Or is it mainly lighthearted? 3) Think about how the author or speaker reaches his or her purpose. You can consider strategies or specific decisions . It is often better to describe what the author is doing and use analytical verbs. Piece: Annotation Notes: In 1882, Mark Twain delivered a speech titled “Advice to Youth” to the Saturday Morning Club, an organization founded for young girls and their intellectual growth. In his speech, Twain frequently undermines common clichés spouted by adults to young people. Being told I would be expected to talk here, I inquired what sort of talk I ought to make. They said it should be something suitable to youth-something didactic, instructive, or something in the nature of good advice. Very well. I have a few things in my mind which I have often longed to say for the instruction of the young; for it is in one’s tender early years that such things will best take root and be most enduring and most valuable. First, then. I will say to you my young friends -- and I say it beseechingly, urgently – Always obey your parents, when they are present. This is the best policy in the long run, because if you don’t, they will make you. Most parents think they know better than you do, and you can generally make more by humoring that superstition than you can by acting on your own better judgment.

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