Doctrine of the Mean

Doctrine of the Mean - Jeffrey A Goodhart Essay on...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Jeffrey A. Goodhart 2/28/08 Essay on Aristotle’s Doctrine of the Mean Some have said that the virtuous are so because they perform virtuous acts. This is too broad an answer for some people. Aristotle delves deeper into this topic and presents his own theory as to what makes a person virtuous and what a virtue is. By the end of Book II, Aristotle states that moral virtue is a mean between two vices, because it aims at what is intermediate in passions and in actions. I believe there is a great deal of philosophical proof behind this claim known as the doctrine of the mean. Moderation is an intermediate between two extremes. The two extremes are excess and deficiency, and the intermediate is the mean. There are two types of means: an absolute and a relative. The absolute mean pertains to that which is equidistant from both extremes. This mean is the same for all. The relative mean is that which is specific for each individual. The person who wishes to lead a balanced, virtuous life should choose the relative mean so as not to obtain too much or too little. Aristotle states that the component of the mean is being able to do something at the right times, with
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

Page1 / 3

Doctrine of the Mean - Jeffrey A Goodhart Essay on...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online